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7/15/2019 10:29 AM

TEAAS crash data is now available through June 2019

 

The Traffic Engineering Accident Analysis System (TEAAS) is a crash analysis software system downloadable from the internet and available free of charge to state government personnel, municipalities, law enforcement agencies, planning organizations, and research entities. TEAAS contains information on all reportable traffic crashes occurring in North Carolina since 1990. It also contains all ordinance information for all state-maintained roads and highways.

Downloads

Download the latest version of TEAAS (Java 8 Update 202 is the recommended version.  Java 9, 10, and 11 are not supported)

Download the latest troubleshooting guide

Download the reference material for the latest version

Download the State Seal for the ordinance Certificate of Rulemaking

Download the UAT version of TEAAS (for software testing only)

Training Dates Times and Locations

TEAAS training has two parts. The first part consists of online self-paced modules that provide an overview of crash data, routes and features, road codes, mileposting, traffic volumes, severity, and ordinances. The second part is a one day instructor led class covering intersection studies, strip studies, and crash analysis techniques. The online self-paced modules must be completed prior to being accepted to the one day instructor led class, and both parts must be completed prior to receiving a permanent TEAAS account. A basic understanding of Excel (opening text files, sorting data, inserting cells, deleting rows, etc.) is desirable, but not required, for this training. All instructor led classes start at 8:30 a.m., and the dates and locations of currently scheduled classes is listed below.

  • June 5, 2019 (750 N. Greenfield Parkway, Garner) – CLASS IS FULL
  • September 19, 2019 (750 N. Greenfield Parkway, Garner)
TEAAS training is now provided through the Road Safety Academy (RSA) of UNC’s Highway Safety Research Center (HSRC). To register for an upcoming training, please contact Dan Gelinne at Gelinne@hsrc.unc.edu or 919-962-8703. Once approved, registrants will receive a confirmation email followed by an invoice (if appropriate). Please contact Dan Gelinne at 919-962-8703 with any questions​.

 

Instructions for Adding the Completed TEAAS Training as External Training to Your LMS Transcript (NCDOT Employees Only)

Garner Facility Information

Asheville Facility Information

Jacksonville Facility Information

 
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12/17/2018 10:41 AM
Spot Safety:
The Spot Safety Program is used to develop smaller improvement projects to address safety, potential safety, and operational issues. The program is funded with state funds and currently receives approximately $9 million per state fiscal year. Other monetary sources (such as Small Construction or Contingency funds) can assist in funding Spot Safety projects, however, the maximum allowable contribution of Spot Safety funds per project is $400,000. A Safety Oversight Committee (SOC) reviews and recommends Spot Safety projects to the Board of Transportation (BOT) for approval and funding. Criteria used by the SOC to select projects for recommendation to the BOT include, but are not limited to, the frequency of correctable crashes, severity of crashes, delay, congestion, number of signal warrants met, effect on pedestrians and schools, division and region priorities, and public interest.
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11/13/2018 8:45 AM

The Hazard Elimination Program is used to develop larger improvement projects to address safety and potential safety issues. The program is funded with 90% federal funds and 10% state funds. The cost of Hazard Elimination Program projects typically ranges between $400,000 and $1 million. A Safety Oversight Committee (SOC) reviews and recommends Hazard Elimination projects to the Board of Transportation (BOT) for approval and funding. These projects are prioritized for funding according to a safety benefit to cost (B/C) ratio, with the safety benefit being based on crash reduction. Once approved and funded by the BOT, these projects become part of the department's State Transportation Improvement Program (STIP).

State Transportation Improvement Program (STIP)

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9/17/2018 5:27 PM

Traffic data consists of turning movements (the number of vehicles making left, right, and through movements), volume/speed/class (the number, direction, speed, and classification of vehicles), spot speed (the speed of isolated vehicles or the lead vehicle of randomly selected platoons), delay (the time, in seconds, that vehicles have to wait), gap (time and/or distance between vehicles), saturation flow rate (the number of vehicles, with respect to time, allowed to travel through a signalized location during one signal cycle), travel time (the amount of time required for a vehicle to travel from one location to another), classification (the types/classes of vehicles), pedestrian corridor crossing (pedestrian movements along a specific corridor), and/or compliance (the tabulation of unit actions grouped by compliance/non-compliance with statutes, ordinances, and traffic control devices) data. This data is generally collected by contractors and typically used for traffic signal warrant analyses, traffic safety analyses, forecasting, planning, seasonal peak development, and traffic mobility analyses.​

Request Traffic Data
Access to request and/or approve the collection of traffic data through the online system is restricted to NCDOT employees and contractors. If you need access, please contact the program manager at https://apps.ncdot.gov/ContactUS//Home/PostComment?Unit=TrCounts

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5/5/2017 8:21 AM

In an attempt to assess the safety of our roads, the Safety Evaluation Group of the Traffic Safety Systems Management Section has evaluated the below projects. The methodologies used in these evaluations offer various philosophies and ideas, in an effort to provide objective countermeasure crash reduction results. This information is provided to you so the benefit or lack of benefit for this type of project can be recognized and utilized for future projects. As the Safety Evaluation Group completes additional reviews for these types of countermeasures, we will be able to provide objective and definite information regarding actual crash reduction factors. ​

Executive Project Summaries

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4/25/2017 3:15 PM

City Rankings are based on the following criteria: Total Crashes, Total Non-Fatal Injury Crashes, Total Fatal Crashes, Annual Crashes Per 1000 Persons, Annual Non-Fatal Injury Crashes Per 1000 Persons, Annual Fatal Crashes Per 1000 People, EPDO (equivalent property damage), Severity Index, Average Annual Crash Cost and Average Annual Crash Cost Per Person.

County Rankings are based the following criteria: Total Crash Rate, Fatal Crash Rate, Non-Fatal Injury Crash Rate, Crash Injuries Per 1000 People, Fatal Crash Injuries Per 1000 People, Non-Fatal Injuries Per 1000 People, Total Crashes Per 1000 Registered Vehicles, Fatal Crashes Per 1000 Registered Vehicles, Non-Fatal Injury Crashes Per 1000 Registered Vehicles, Percent Alcohol-Related Crashes, Severity Index, Annual Cost Per 100 Miles Traveled, Annual Cost Per Person and Annual Cost Per Vehicle.

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4/11/2016 8:31 AM

The purpose of the North Carolina Highway Safety Improvement Program (HSIP) is to provide a continuous and systematic process that identifies reviews and addresses specific traffic safety concerns throughout the state. The program is structured in several distinct phases:

 A system of safety warrants is developed to identify locations that are possibly deficient.
  • Locations that meet warrant criteria are categorized as potentially hazardous (PH) locations.

  • Detailed crash analyses are performed on the PH locations with the more severe and correctable crash patterns.

  • The Regional Traffic Engineering staff performs engineering field investigations.

  • The Regional Traffic Engineering staff utilizes Benefit: Cost studies and other tools to develop safety recommendations.

  • Depending on the cost and nature of the countermeasures, the investigations may result in requesting Division maintenance forces to make adjustments or repairs, developing Spot Safety projects, developing Hazard Elimination projects, making adjustments to current TIP project plans or utilizing other funding sources to initiate countermeasures.

  • Selected projects are evaluated to determine the effectiveness of countermeasures.

The ultimate goal of the HSIP is to reduce the number of traffic crashes, injuries and fatalities by reducing the potential for and the severity of these incidents on public roadways. 

Click here for the mapped HSIP Locations

 
HSIP Detailed Reports
HSIP Potentially Hazardous Location Reports by Year and County
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9/18/2014 8:30 AM
This web site is provided as a public service by the North Carolina Department of Transportation. Information available on this web site is collected, maintained, and provided solely for the convenience of the user. While every effort is made to assure that this information is accurate and current, the North Carolina Department of Transportation does not certify the authenticity of the information contained herein. As revisions are made to the document contained herein, they will be posted through this web site. It is soley the user's responsibility to maintain for their use the most current version of this document.
 
The North Carolina Department of Transportation shall under no circumstances be responsible for any errors or omissions which may occur in these records, nor liable for any actions taken as a result of reliance upon any information contained within this web site from whatever source, or any consequences from such reliance.
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7/12/2013 11:21 AM

CLS - Classification
COM - Compliance
DEL - Delay
GAP - Gap
PCC - Pedestrian Corridor Crossing
SFR - Saturation Flow Rate
SS - Spot Speed
TM - Turning Movement
TT - Travel Time
VID - Video
VSC - Volume/Speed/Class​

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4/3/2013 12:50 PM

This web site is provided as a public service by the North Carolina Department of Transportation. Information available on this web site is collected, maintained, and provided solely for the convenience of the user. While every effort is made to assure that this information is accurate and current, the North Carolina Department of Transportation does not certify the authenticity of the information contained herein. As revisions are made to the document contained herein, they will be posted through this web site. It is soley the user's responsibility to maintain for their use the most current version of this document.

The North Carolina Department of Transportation shall under no circumstances be responsible for any errors or omissions which may occur in these records, nor liable for any actions taken as a result of reliance upon any information contained within this web site from whatever source, or any consequences from such reliance.

Click here to acknowledge the disclaimer and enter the site.

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9/21/2012 8:42 AM

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Student Loading Operations - Loading operations for both parents and buses are examined. Loading areas are observed for efficiency and safety. Recommendations include the following, but not limited to, improvements on loading process, identifying loading bays, restrictions for loading zone, advanced identification program, loading from passenger side of vehicle, etc. 
  
Queue Length - Student loading operations are examined to provide the safest and most efficient patterns involving parents, students and buses. School driveways are measured to assure adequate queuing length to keep school traffic from interrupting nearby roads. Other information needed from Existing School * or School Site Plans * are needed before analyses and recommendations can be provided by MSTA. 
  
Parking - Parking characteristic influence the overall traffic congestion and student loading process and organization. When necessary, MSTA provides recommendations to better utilize the existing parking lots and/or provide more efficient parking lot designs. 
  
Pedestrian Safety - Facilities for relating to pedestrians (such as crosswalks, crossing guards, sidewalks, etc.) are examined to provide students with a safe environment to walk to and from school.  
  
Signing - Inventory of signs located within campus and school zone are examined. These signs pertain to school zone identification, parking restrictions, speed limit, etc.

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9/20/2012 10:18 AM

To help provide additional information about school traffic concerns, MSTA has been working with the Institute for Transportation Research and Education (ITRE) at North Carolina State University. Please visit their web site at: http://www.itre.ncsu.edu/stg for more information on the following topics:​

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9/20/2012 10:08 AM

MSTA performs studies that address the safety concerns with the overall pedestrian safety and traffic operations on a school campus, and how traffic affects adjacent state roadways. To calculate the school operations, MSTA has developed a database of specific data that is compared to similar schools across North Carolina.

Data indicates that AM traffic operations on a school campus usually operate safely and efficiently due to parent traffic arriving at a broader range of times.  PM traffic operations are quite different, most often parents arrive well before the school dismissal and park or queue (back up) along the campus driveway. The PM queue often results with vehicles stopped in the roadway or along the shoulder of a major through route, which increase the chances of accidents and similar traffic related safety concerns.​

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9/7/2012 10:35 AM

J. Kevin Lacy, PE
Director of Mobility and Safety

Contact the Transportation Mobility and Safety Division

Contact the Traffic Safety Unit

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8/20/2012 1:47 PM
Traffic Engineering Policies, Practices, and Legal Authority (TEPPL) was developed to provide NCDOT staff a place to find documented and/or official information on topics related to traffic engineering, and to hopefully encourage consistent responses to and implementation of transportation questions and issues.

 

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8/17/2012 12:53 PM

Traffic ordinances include the maintenance and revision of speed zones, no parking zones, turning prohibitions, Truck routes, route changes, etc. The State Traffic Engineer is the approving authority for traffic ordinances, and the approval of specific ordinances is based on traffic engineering studies and is in accordance with North Carolina General Statutes.​

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6/12/2012 10:21 AM

Mileposting is the process of determining the location of features on a road, in miles, from the beginning of the road, and is a fundamental requirement of the Traffic Engineering and Accident Analysis System (TEAAS) necessary for crash studies and analyses, crash rates, and ordinance overlap checks. Mileposts are based on information in NCDOT's Linear Referencing System (LRS) maintained by the Geographic Information Systems (GIS) Unit, and are used to determine where crashes occurred, or where ordinances are located, in relation to roadway features. Features requiring mileposts are intersections and interchanges, at-grade railroad crossings, mile markers, structures (that carry the road), and political boundaries (municipal, county, and state lines).

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