expand Division : 00 SAFETY ‎(1)
expand Division : 01 GENERAL REQUIREMENTS ‎(7)
expand Division : 02 EARTHWORK ‎(15)
expand Division : 03 PIPE ‎(8)
expand Division : 04 MAJOR STRUCTURES ‎(22)
expand Division : 05 SUBGRADES AND BASES ‎(12)
expand Division : 06 ASPHALT PAVEMENTS ‎(11)
expand Division : 07 CONCRETE PAVEMENTS ‎(4)
expand Division : 08 INCIDENTALS ‎(30)
expand Division : 09 SIGNING ‎(7)
expand Division : 10 MATERIALS ‎(39)
expand Division : 11 TRAFFIC CONTROL ‎(14)
expand Division : 12 PAVEMENT MARKINGS ‎(13)
expand Division : 14 LIGHTING ‎(9)
expand Division : 15 UTILITIES ‎(9)
expand Division : 16 EROSION CONTROL AND ROADSIDE DEVELOPMENT ‎(29)
expand Division : 17 SIGNALS AND INTELLIGENT TRANSPORTATION SYSTEMS ‎(31)
expand Division : ENGINEERING CONTROL ‎(1)
expand Division : SIGNIFICANT REVISIONS ‎(1)
  
expand R & R Section : RECORDS AND REPORTS ‎(46)
No content found

 

 

  • 04 MAJOR STRUCTURES

  • SECTION 455 PRECAST GRAVITY RETAINING WALLS

  •  


    455-3 PRECONSTRUCTION REQUIREMENTS
     
    The inspectors should thoroughly familiarize themselves with all documentation regarding the wall construction.  Available substructure information should also be consulted.  Wall envelope verification should take place well before construction is planned to start.

    455-4 CONSTRUCTION METHODS

    Shoring necessary for wall construction is incidental to the wall unless the excavation for the wall violates the “Shoring for the Maintenance of Traffic” Special Provision.  This provision states “Temporary shoring is required to maintain traffic when a 2:1 (H:V) slope from the top of an embankment or bottom of an excavation will intersect the existing ground line less than 5 ft from the edge of pavement of an open travelway.” 

    Drainage of the material behind the wall is vital to the design and performance of the wall.  Ensure that the drainage system is properly installed and functioning.

    ADDITIONAL RESOURCES


  •  


    454-3 PRECONSTRUCTION REQUIREMENTS
     
    The inspectors should thoroughly familiarize themselves with all documentation regarding the wall construction.  Available substructure information should also be consulted.  Wall envelope verification should take place well before construction is planned to start.

    454-4 CONSTRUCTION METHODS

    Shoring necessary for wall construction is incidental to the wall unless the excavation for the wall violates the “Shoring for the Maintenance of Traffic” Special Provision.  This provision states “Temporary shoring is required to maintain traffic when a 2:1 (H:V) slope from the top of an embankment or bottom of an excavation will intersect the existing ground line less than 5 ft from the edge of pavement of an open travelway.” 

    Drainage of the material behind the wall is vital to the design and performance of the wall.  Ensure that the drainage system is properly installed and functioning.

    ADDITIONAL RESOURCES


  •  


    453-3 GRAVITY WALL SURVEYS
     
     The inspectors should thoroughly familiarize themselves with all documentation regarding the wall construction.  Available substructure information should also be consulted.  Wall envelope verification should take place well before construction is planned to start.

    453-4 CONSTRUCTION METHODS

    Shoring necessary for wall construction is incidental to the wall unless the excavation for the wall violates the “Shoring for the Maintenance of Traffic” Special Provision.  This provision states “Temporary shoring is required to maintain traffic when a 2:1 (H:V) slope from the top of an embankment or bottom of an excavation will intersect the existing ground line less than 5 ft from the edge of pavement of an open travelway.” 

    Drainage of the material behind the wall is vital to the design and performance of the wall.  Ensure that the drainage system is properly installed and functioning.

    ADDITIONAL RESOURCES


  • 1) Field verify S-dimensions.

    2) Verify the sign legend and spelling to ensure that it fits the field conditions.

    3) Check lateral and vertical clearance of sign structures.

    4) Ensure the contractor requests signs a minimum of 4 months in advance of need.

    5) Contact Materials and Test Unit for sign inspection.

    6) Ensure that clearing for sign sight distance is complete.

    7) Wash all signs prior to the final inspection.

    8) Contact Materials and Test Unit for final sign inspection.

    9) Ensure that clearing provides proper sign distance for all signs.



  •  
     

    USE OF PHOTOGRAMMETRY FOR DETERMINATION OF EXCAVATION QUANTITIES
     
    GENERAL
     
    Aerial survey methods used by the Photogrammetry Unit for determining excavation quantities have been proven to be as accurate as ground survey methods. Use of aerial surveys for this purpose may allow a Resident Engineer to better utilize available manpower. The decision to utilize the Photogrammetry Unit to provide this service should be based on several factors, which are listed below. In general, the safety of NCDOT employees, the quantity of earthwork involved, and extent of acreage under construction must be of sufficient volume to make this type of operation economical.
     
    Factors to Consider Before Requesting the Use of Photogrammetry:
     
    1. Are there safety issues that exist where NCDOT employees are at a higher risk of injury to perform field surveys?
       
    2. Are there 100,000 cubic yards or more of unclassified excavation?
       
    3. Is the workload of the Resident Engineer’s office such that Photogrammetry is needed?
       
    4. Are there environmental concerns that make it cost prohibitive to use Photogrammetry (can only clear small areas at a time)?
       
    5. Does traffic control phasing cause a need for numerous flights?
       
    6. Natural ground and finished excavation must be above water.
       
    7. It is necessary to have the area, to be flown, cleared and grubbed prior to the aerial survey. It is important that all required erosion control measures be installed in conjunction with clearing and grubbing.
       
    8. Cost of ground surveys versus aerial surveys with respect to project topography and complexity must be considered. For a 17 – 20 acre site, the cost for both ground surveys and aerial surveys are approximately the same. As a rule, the smaller the site the more economical it is for ground surveys and the larger the site the more economical it is for aerial surveys.
       
    9. Total turn around time for original and final terrain compilation and earthwork computation will be based upon schedules between the Resident Engineer and Photogrammetry.
       
    10. It should be shown that it is in the best interest of the Department from the standpoint of construction personnel utilization and total construction engineering cost.
       
    11. Aerial photography provides a permanent record of terrain on the date of photography and can be a valuable source of information for verifying earthwork quantities, ground conditions, etc., in the event of disputes or litigation.
       
    12. Safety of field personnel, particularly in areas adjacent to high-speed, heavy traffic volumes, should be a consideration when determining whether aerial surveys should be used.
     
    The Resident Engineer and Division Construction Engineer should decide the method of terrain data collection to be used on a project prior to the Preconstruction Conference. If Photogrammetry is chosen as the most economical or practical method, the State Photogrammetric Engineer’s office should be contacted in writing so that work scoping and scheduling can begin.

    ROLE OF THE CONTRACTOR
     
    The Contractor should be informed at the Preconstruction Conference if photogrammetric methods will be utilized to determine terrain data used for earthwork quantities. Article 225-7 of the Specifications indicates that the decision to use either aerial or ground surveys for excavation quantities is the Engineer’s, but it is important to let the Contractor know as soon as possible since the decision will have a significant impact on his operations. All communication between the Contractor and the Photogrammetry Unit should be through the Resident Engineer.
     
    The Contractor may be required to clear and grub more than the 17 acres included in Article 225-7 of the Specifications, which means the erodible surface will be in excess of that normally deemed desirable for the control of erosion. Projects can and should, if feasible, be flown in stages. The Contractor must simultaneously install all measures required by the plans for the clearing and grubbing phase and have the necessary equipment available to maintain these devices over a relatively large area. The Contractor should be advised that the opening of larger areas to accommodate photogrammetric methods would not affect the areas allowed for grading operations. To ensure high resolution in the aerial photography, the Resident Engineer must prohibit the Contractor from performing any burning on the day a photo mission is scheduled to be flown.
     
    In some instances, the Photogrammetry Unit will not always be able to fly a project before a Contractor is ready to begin his grading operations. In these instances, the Resident Engineer must take the required original terrain data by ground survey methods so the Contractor will not be delayed. The original terrain data representing these areas must then be forwarded to the Photogrammetry Unit prior to or concurrent with the ground control surveys so they can be combined with the aerial survey terrain data for incorporation into the total earthwork computations for the project.
     
    Information to Provide to the Photogrammetry Unit:
     
    1. Written request to the State Photogrammetric Engineer notifying of the intent to use Photogrammetry.
       
    2. Notice should be provided to the Photogrammetry Unit prior to the Preconstruction Conference so that scoping and scheduling can begin.
       
    3. Approximate the length that will be cleared and grubbed before flying starts. This length should normally be 2000 feet or greater. The decision on length of project to be flown should be mutually determined by the Resident Engineer and the Photogrammetry Unit.
       
    4. Estimate the date when the project would be ready for a flight to take place.
       
    5. The Resident Engineer’s office will be responsible for coordinating the placement and control of ground control panels. These panels should be set according to the panel plan provided by Photogrammetry. Questions concerning placement of panels may also be directed to the Photogrammetry Unit. Ground control surveys must be performed either by Location & Surveys staff or by state approved licensed Professional Land Surveyors. Weather and schedule permitting, the photo mission will be flown immediately upon completion of the paneling operation. IMPORTANT NOTE: Panels cannot be disturbed until area has been flown and the ground control surveys have been completed. The aerial photography is normally processed the same day the mission is flown. The Photogrammetry Unit notifies the Resident Engineer the next workday if the photography has been accomplished.
       
    6. The Resident Engineer must furnish the Photogrammetry Unit with electronic copies of the ground control (including the localization report), slope stake data, and available project profile levels before compilation of the terrain data can begin.
       
    7. The Resident Engineer should inform the Photogrammetry Unit, preferably with a MicroStation design file and associated explanation, of any construction areas that will require special consideration (such as detours, borrow pits, etc.)

    ORIGINAL TERRAIN DATA
     
    After the Photogrammetry Unit has compiled an original terrain model, the Resident Engineer should be furnished an electronic copy of the original terrain data. Upon request, a copy of the printout and a graphic plot can be provided.
     
    In order to provide a check of the original terrain data determined by the Photogrammetry Unit, the Resident Engineer should collect some terrain data points as slope stakes are set. These terrain data points should be furnished to the Photogrammetry Unit with the slope stake data. The Digital Terrain Model from the Photogrammetry Unit should be checked to ensure that coverage is carried out far enough. Any corrections or extensions that are needed should be identified and furnished to the Photogrammetry Unit. After all corrections and/or additions are made, the Resident Engineer will be furnished with a copy of the digital terrain model. The Contractor should be provided with one copy of the original cross-sections printout.

    FINAL TERRAIN DATA
     
    After the Contractor has completed grading the project, the Resident Engineer should contact the Photogrammetry Unit for an estimated date when aerial survey can be performed. The Resident Engineer must furnish a copy of all plan changes that affect horizontal or vertical limits as originally shown in the plans as this may impact the original terrain data. Panels will also have to be set by the Resident Engineer’s office prior to the flight. The Photogrammetry Unit requires a minimum of 3 days notice prior to the flight. Weather and schedule permitting, the photo mission will be flown immediately upon completion of the paneling operation.
     
    Before the final terrain data and excavation quantities can be determined, the Resident Engineer must furnish the Photogrammetry Unit electronic copies of the final ground controls, slope stake data, and available project profile levels of the final profile along each line. Template information accounting for the sub-grade earthwork will be taken from the plans.
     
    After the final terrain data has been determined, the Photogrammetry Unit may compute the unclassified earthwork estimate. After the unclassified earthwork estimate has been computed, it will be furnished to the Resident Engineer. The Resident Engineer’s office should provide a check of the final terrain data by collecting some terrain data points in the field and comparing them to the Photogrammetry Unit’s terrain data. The Digital Terrain Model from the Photogrammetry Unit should be checked to ensure that coverage is carried out far enough. Any corrections or extensions that are needed should be identified and furnished to the Photogrammetry Unit. After all corrections and/or additions are made, the Resident Engineer will be furnished with a copy of the digital terrain model and an earthwork summary sheet with an estimated volume of unclassified material.

    DOCUMENTATION
     
    Where terrain data is determined by aerial surveys, the source documents to establish payment for the excavation quantities will be pay record data, all electronic terrain and data files, photograph negatives, and control prints. The Photogrammetry Unit, as part of their permanent records, will retain the film negatives, control prints, digital images, electronic files of terrain data, and all official correspondence.

    AERIAL PHOTOGRAPHY
     
    Aerial photography provides an accurate and efficient means of obtaining earthwork quantities for a project. Control panels enable the Photogrammetry Unit to orient the film both horizontally and vertically and to obtain the correct scale. A survey party is required to install control panels prior to the aerial photography. The Resident Engineer’s survey party normally installs all of the control panels. If the Resident Engineer needs assistance in installing the panels, the Location and Surveys Unit should be contacted. Ground control surveys must be performed either by Location & Surveys staff or by state approved licensed professional surveyors. See Records and Reports elsewhere in this Manual.
     
    Preliminary Planning
     
    The Photogrammetry Unit should be notified at least one week prior to paneling the project. Photogrammetry will need the following information for their flight:
     
    1. Project and TIP Numbers
       
    2. The alignment that the flight is being scheduled for.
       
    3. Estimated construction schedule (clearing & grubbing and final grading)
       
    4. Beginning and ending stations of each alignment
       
    5. Special criteria, if any. (Right side only, left side only, or other considerations)
       
    6. The need for final intermediate flights.
       
    7. If the flight is for borrow pits a location map and limits will need to be supplied.
    Paneling
     
    The Photogrammetry Unit will develop a panel plan for the required area. The panel plan will be supplied to the Resident Engineer.
     
    • Panels should be placed according to the supplied panel plan. If a panel(s) needs to be moved from the designated location, notify and coordinate with the Photogrammetry Unit for the new location(s).
       
    • Panel arrows should have legs approximately 5 feet in length and 6 inches in width.
       
    • The panels will either be on a 5’ x 5’ sheet of black plastic, painted on a roadway surface, or use temporary striping tape (See Figure 1). Regardless of what is used, there needs to be sufficient contrast between the panel and the background material.
       
    • Duron Alkyd Hiding White exterior paint is recommended.
       
    • Panels should be placed on an unobstructed level area.
       
    • The point of the arrow should represent the control point and should be where the horizontal and vertical data is read.
    Controlling Panels
     
    The control for all panels should be based off of the same control monuments used to control the final design. This information is located in the Plan Sheets. If there is any question concerning the control monuments, the Location and Surveys Unit should be contacted.
     
    • All panels should be fully controlled (x, y, and z).
       
    • Panels are to be placed and numbered according to the supplied panel plan.
       
    • When more than one flight is necessary, coordinate with the Photogrammetry Unit on which panels to set.
       
    • The panel number should be painted on the top right hand corner of each panel.
    Field Data
     
    The horizontal and vertical control data for the panels should be provided to the Photogrammetry Unit as soon as possible within a maximum of two weeks after the flight. The control data should be delivered to the Photogrammetry Unit electronically in the following format:
     
    Panel ID# x – coordinate y - coordinate z – coordinate Alignment Station offset
    (as needed)
     
    Example: P1 1123456.78 212345.67 312.34
                  P2 1123465.87 212354.78 223.45 L 10+00
                  P3 1124567.89 212367.89 321.98
                  P4 1124567.89 212456.78 345.67
                  P5 1124676.89 212567.89 258.36 L 19+00 35’ left
     
    Borrow Pits
     
    Prior to paneling any borrow pit, discuss the specifics with the Photogrammetry Unit. The Photogrammetry Unit will provide a panel plan for the pit. Control for the panels should be based off the localized NCGRID.
     
    General
     
    Requesting the use of Photogrammetry for aerial surveys depends on various factors. Some of these factors are: the size of the area to be flown (the cleared and grubbed area); the number of ‘original’, ‘intermediate’ and ‘final’ flights required; the number of panels to be set prior to flying each section; the length of time to control the panels for each flight; and having adequate weather conditions to fly the aerial photography.
     
    Once the Photogrammetry Unit has been notified in writing and the scope of the required photogrammetry work is clear, the acquisition of photography and unclassified earthwork estimation can begin. The preparation of the panel plan for the project can take up to a month to prepare. Placing the panels at the prescribed locations is important to properly control the project area.
     
    To schedule a flight, the Photogrammetry Unit should be notified 3 days prior to the panels being completely set. The Photogrammetry Unit coordinates with the Aviation Branch to fly the project. The flight over the project area is dependent on adequate weather conditions. Occasionally it will be necessary to field inspect the control panels to ensure their condition when there have been weather delays.
     
    When the Photogrammetry Unit receives the control, the collection of terrain data will begin, in the form of a Digital Terrain Model (DTM). The process of developing a DTM will be repeated for all subsequent flights, either for original ground, intermediate quantities (partial earthwork estimate), or for final earthwork estimate. Volume calculations are based off comparisons between the original DTMs and the final DTMs.
                ENGINEERING CONTROL - TYPICAL FIELD NOTES.png
    DETERMINATION OF "S" DIMENSIONS
     
    The field verification of “S” dimensions for ground mounted and overhead signs is a critical step in the design and construction process. Due to time constraints, this process should take place early in the project stages as soon as the project stake out information is available. The project phasing should be reviewed and discussed with the Contractor so that any signs that will need to be erected during early phases of the work are reviewed first. Slope stake data as determined by the Resident Engineers staff should be used in lieu of waiting for grading to be complete. When the project stake out is completed by the Contractor, the Resident Engineer should encourage this to be completed early and check the information for accuracy before requesting a plan revision.
     
    The dimensions listed on the plans must be checked against the actual field conditions and any corrected distances provided to Traffic Engineering so that they may issue revised plan sheets. Form sheets for this will be provided by Traffic Engineering upon request. It should be noted that the distances below the point of reference on the drawings are positive and the distances above are negative. The following procedures should be used for verification of “S” dimensions:
     
    1. The Resident Engineer or Contractor (depending on who is responsible for project stake out) should review the overhead sign drawings as shown in the original plans for accuracy. These drawings shall then be compared against the project typical sections as well as against the project roadway plans (including cross- sections). The location of these signs should then be reviewed in terms of placement or location of other conflicts including existing or proposed drainage systems, underground and/or above ground utilities, drainage ditches, etc. Adjustments in the location of these signs may be necessary to avoid these obstacles. Any relocation of these signs by any appreciable amount should be done only with consultation of the Project Signing Engineer.
       
    2. Once signs are “conflict free,” the typical section at each station will then be used to determine the actual theoretical finished section at that station. The actual section will be determined using proper lane and shoulder widths (taking into account any tapers existing at these locations), roadway superelevations, shoulder rollovers, side ditches, barrier rail sections, etc.
       
    3. Where applicable, slope stakes will be set at each sign location to verify all theoretical calculations. It is essential that the Contractor build the slopes in accordance with these slope stakes.
       
    4. All of the above information will then be used (in conjunction with the finished grade at each sign location and the minimum clearance as indicated on the plans) to determine the “S” dimensions.
       
    5. The fill and cut slopes at each sign support location also needs to be verified to ensure correctness of the plans. Any changes in these side slopes need to be noted and corrections sent to the Signing Unit along with the completed verified “S” dimensions.
       
    6. Once field verification is complete, the results will be transmitted by the Resident Engineer to the Traffic Engineering Signing Unit.
    Once this information is received by Traffic Engineering, and the revisions are complete, the revised plans will be forwarded to the Resident Engineer for his use and further distribution to the Contractor. The Resident Engineer should verify any changes that were made during the field verification are properly reflected. The Contractor may then proceed with the design of the overhead structures.
     
    Any plan revisions must be taken into account when these dimensions are verified. Also remember to revise these “S” dimensions as necessary if plan revisions come out after the field verification process is complete.

    VERIFICATION OF GROUND MOUNTED SIGNS
     
    The “S” dimension for ground mounted signs is the difference in elevation from the edge of travel lane to the point where the centerline of the support touches the ground. The edge of the travel lane is not the outside edge of the paved shoulder. When determining the “S” dimension, note if the elevation is above the travel lane or below the travel lane. In signing, positive (+) is used for elevations that are below the travel lane and negative (-) for elevations above the travel lane. If a sign is relocated in the field, note the new station and “S” dimensions so that the plans can be changed. See the following drawing titled “Verification of Ground Mounted Signs” for clarification.
     
    ENGINEERING CONTROL - VERIFICATION OF GROUND MOUNTED SIGNS.png
    VERIFICATION OF OVERHEAD SIGN ASSEMBLIES
     
    Checking the information on overhead sign assemblies in the field will consist of “S” dimensions at the center of the structure upright supports, cut or fill slopes, and pavement width information. The “S” dimension for overheads is different from that of ground mounted signs. The elevation of the center of the upright is from the high point of the road. This includes paved shoulders, mountable medians, future lanes, or any point that a vehicle could physically drive on under any sign on the overhead structure. The side slope is the slope at the centerline of the uprights and at least 2 feet on both sides. Both the “S” dimension and the slopes are used by Structure Design to check the footing design. The width of each lane or part of a lane, shoulders, and the offset to the uprights should be verified. This is the cross section that the contractor will have to construct. See attached drawing on the proceeding page for clarification.
     
    For projects that have contract surveying, the Contractor will be responsible for providing this information to the Resident Engineer in accordance with Subarticle 801-2(H) of the 2012 Standard Specifications. The Resident Engineer will forward the information to the Signing Section for review and the design of the revised signing plans.
     
    Verifications of these dimensions must be made before supports for the ground mounted or overhead signs can be ordered by the contractor.
     
    ENGINEERING CONTROL - VERIFICATION OF OVERHEAD MOUNTED SIGNS.png
    STRUCTURE STAKEOUT
     
    Structure and Roadway plans should be studied together prior to beginning staking in order to become familiar with the planned work, to establish where reference points may be placed and remain undisturbed, to check lengths of box culverts as required on the culvert plans, and to check and recalculate slope, roadway widths, and elevations common to structure and adjacent roadway.
     
    During stakeout and construction of the structures, bound field or level books shall be used for structure work books in which shall be recorded: diagrams and sketches showing location of construction stakes set; complete level notes of elevations set for all parts of the structure and grade hubs; the names of all those doing the survey work, what each person did, and the date the work was done.
     
    Structures should be staked using the most accurate equipment and methods at the Resident Engineer's disposal. Total stations or transits equipped with electronic distance measuring devices are preferred. However, with skill, care, and proper procedure, the one minute transit and chain can produce adequate results. Radial Stakeout should not be used for major structure stakeout. Chaining must be done level, utilizing tension handles, and performing any necessary corrections, such as temperature. All angles should be doubled. Distances should be read at least to the nearest 3 millimeters or one hundredth (0.01) of a foot. Control lines to be staked and referenced for bridges are: centerline or long chord line, end bent fill face lines, and interior bent centerlines, or other designated work lines. For box culverts the lines are: centerline of culvert and ends of barrel. Offset grade hubs should also be set for culverts. Hubs with tacks and clearly marked guard stakes shall be used to reference these lines. When grade separations, either highway or railroad, are to be staked, it is the best practice, where possible, to begin the stakeout from the equality on the alignment being spanned. By proceeding in this manner, accumulative differences in chaining or errors in stationing along the line on which the structure is to be built will not affect the horizontal clearance.  The Manual For Construction Stakeout should be followed.
     
    The sketches represent typical bridge and culvert layouts. They should be varied to suit individual cases. The links to the sketches can be found here.
     
     
    Checking Layout
     
    Resident Engineers and Party Chiefs should develop a systematic scheme for checking a structure stakeout both during the stakeout and after the structure has been laid out. Each measurement, whether a chained distance, angle turned, or elevation given should be checked. One scheme that will serve to check the work is to let entirely different personnel check the layout. This is one scheme of many and would not necessarily involve an entirely new party but a simple change in duties performed.
     
    For example, the head chainman could read the plans to check the Party Chief's plan interpretation, the rear chainman could serve as head chainman to read the measurements between previously placed points, another party member could measure the complement of the angle previously set accumulatively by repeated measurement, elevations could be checked by double rodding from independent bench marks, or a reversal of rodman and levelman duties. This scheme will also serve to provide additional experience and training for party personnel.
     
    Engineering Practices To Follow
     
    1. Check instruments periodically for accuracy.
       
    2. Check alignment stationing in the field from two independent references.
       
    3. Check bench marks in the field from two independent references. All bench marks which are established for use during construction should be, as nearly as practicable, of a permanent nature. Check bench marks used for structure construction with bench marks used for roadway construction. When setting bench marks, avoid setting them in deep embankments that have not set for several months or in any embankments in the vicinity of anticipated pile driving operations. This can be an inconvenience, but problems can arise due to settlement of the bench marks. Levels can be run from bench marks in other areas and temporary bench marks set, or checked, each time critical elevations are necessary, or at least once a week while in use except when pile driving has been taking place. If pile driving has taken place in the vicinity, the temporary bench marks set in embankments should be checked at least daily when in use.
       
    4. Completely stake structure when practicable before construction begins.
       
    5. Systematically and uniformly identify all points with clearly marked guard stakes.
       
    6. Set extra points to facilitate replacing those destroyed.
       
    7. Check railroad rail elevations against bottom of beam elevations at railroad separations during stakeout and compare difference in elevations to vertical clearance shown on plans.
       
    8. Check cut and fill slopes at end bents during and after grading but prior to starting structure construction.
       
    9. Immediately prior to casting the cap of a substructure unit, elevations are to be checked on the chamfer strip for each bridge seat. Immediately after all concrete the cap has been cast, another check is to be made at each bridge seat using an independent set-up of the instrument. Any falsework slippage or excessive settlement will then be apparent. After the first substructure unit has been completed, both of the above checks shall include a check on a bridge seat of a previously cast cap. All rod readings and computations for the above shall be recorded, dated, and initialed in the structure field book.
       
    10. Check camber in beams and girders after they are erected but before connections are tightened. Beam camber shall be corrected to conform to 12 millimeters (1/2 inch) for proper tolerance.
       
    11. Check bridge slab thickness when the dry run is performed. Check camber in screed.
       
    12. Check projection of shear studs into slab.
       
    13. Slope protection berm width should be computed prior to slope staking the ends of the bridge fills. The toe of the slope protection should be staked to insure that alignment and grade will conform with that of the roadway.
       
    14. It is usually good practice to establish a temporary bench mark on a substructure as soon as it is completed. This is usually accomplished by setting one temporary benchmark on a wing wall of each end bent.
       
    15. Check top of pavement elevations against bottom of beam elevation at flyovers during stakeout and compare difference in elevations to vertical clearance shown on plans to insure it is sufficient.

    SUGGESTED PROCEDURE FOR GRADING BUILD-UPS ON CONTINUOUS OR SIMPLE SPAN BRIDGES
     
    Final bottom of slab elevations at twentieth points between centerline of bearings are furnished by the Structure Design Unit. The elevations are given along the centerline of each girder and are used in computing the height of the build-ups.
     
    Build-up height is fixed at the centerline of bearing and would be constant throughout the length of a span if the actual girder camber was exactly as shown, the build-ups will normally vary in height between bearings.
     
    Tops of girders should be marked with paint at each twentieth point. (For longer spans 40th or 60th points may be required – see construction elevations provided from the Structure Design Unit.) After camber has been checked, necessary corrections made and diaphragm connection bolts tightened, elevations should be determined on top of girders at each twentieth point and used computing build-up heights. The effect of the sun can significantly change girder camber. Levels should be run either early in the morning or on a completely overcast morning. Deflections shown in the deflection tables are used in the required computations. Build-up height at a twentieth point is computed as follows:
     
    + final bottom of slab elevation
    + deflection due to weight of slab
    + deflection due to weight of parapet, rail, and F.W.S.
    - top of girder elevation (determined in field)
     
    The algebraic sum of these values equals the height of build-up above the top of girder. In some cases, this value will be minus indicating the girder flange projects into the slab.  In such cases the Area Construction Engineer should be consulted.
     
    The build-up heights for the entire bridge can be computed and listed in a field book well in advance of any forming operation. These heights can be marked on the top of girder at the proper tenth point.
     
    The Contractor should be made aware that the computed height is at the centerline of girder and will vary at each side of the build-up depending on the deck cross slope and flange width.
     
    Theoretical overhang elevations are no longer supplied and should not be used to grade overhangs.
     
    Overhangs can be graded very efficiently by using the overhang typical section and adjusting by a small amount of form settlement and compensating for build-ups on the top of the exterior girders or beams.  This can be done either with a “preacher” or checking the algebraic difference from the buildup to the overhang with an engineer’s level.
     
    It should be noted that bridges with normal crown and similar overhangs on both sides can be graded using one typical section with the algebraic difference between the bottom of slab over the exterior girder or beam and the outside bottom edge of the overhang. A structure with constant superelevation will require two typical section computations. A structure with variable superelevation or varying width overhangs, such as those found on horizontally curved bridges with straight girders, will require a different typical section computation at each grade point if the superelevation or overhang width changes.
     
    With this method, it is suggested 1/40th points be used on exterior girders or beams for build-ups where spans are greater than 15 meters (50 feet) in length to keep grade points spaced reasonably. Regardless of grade point spacing, all overhang brackets or jacks should be graded. A quick interpolation between grade points with adjustment for top flange thickness when it changes, can be easily calculated.  String-lining between graded jacks to set other jacks is also acceptable.
     
    Following is an example in English Units of using this method to grade overhang formwork: See Figure 1.
     
    Step 1 - Compute algebraic difference between bottom of slab and outside bottom edge of overhang:
     
    + 0.71                 8-1/2 inch slab
    - 0.03                  to gutter line
    - 0.00                  level under barrier rail
    - 0.94                  outside slab dimension
    + 0.02                 form settlement
    - 0.24                  algebraic difference including form settlement
     
    Therefore, grade for an overhang point opposite a field build-up of +0.12 = -0.24 + 0.12 = -0.12 below the top of beam or girder.
     
    Beginning in April 2017 the construction elevations were revised to provide the algebraic difference between the bottom of the slab over the centerline of the exterior girder and the outside edge of the overhang, eliminating the calculations above , with the exception of adding in form settlement.  The construction elevations would give the difference of -0.26’, and the +0.02 form settlement would then need to be added.

     
    Step 2 - Show overhang grades in structure workbook opposite build-up grades and adjusted to level over from top of beam or girder with the use of an engineering level and rod or a carpenter level and rule. Interpolate in between grades to adjust each overhang bracket or jack to assure uniform grade. It is acceptable to string line between jacks at twentieth points which have been graded, to grade intermediate jacks. All grades can be computed and checked in the structure workbook well ahead of  time.
     
    The reason construction theoretical grades should not be used (and are no longer included in Construction Elevations) is to eliminate the effects temperature changes and the constant movement of girders or beams. Using typical sections will assure all overhangs are relative to the girder or beam and therefore a constant slope will be attained on the bottom of overhangs. In an extreme case, it would be possible to have a reverse slope on the overhang bottom if the girder or beam has moved sufficiently down and a theoretical elevation is used. 
    ENGINEERING CONTROL - INTERIOR BENT.png 

    SUGGESTED PROCEDURE FOR GRADING HEADERS
     
    As of April 2017, header grades are no longer supplied in the construction elevations.  Better results are observed when the transverse screed is graded as outlined below and the header is left 1-2” low.  The screed is allowed to finish over the header to the proper grade.  
    If the contractor elects to use a longitudinal screed contact you Area Construction Engineer for guidance on setting header elevations.

    SUGGESTED PROCEDURE FOR GRADING SCREEDS
     
    A. Transverse Screed
     
    After overhang forms have been graded, the screed rail can be adjusted to some predetermined constant height above the bottom form at the outside edge of overhang. A gage stick and carpenter's level can be used in adjusting the screed rail to the proper elevation.
     
    The screed carriage must be graded to conform to the transverse slope of the deck, taking into consideration the weight of the operator and trowel mechanism.
     
    Dry runs should be made in accordance with the procedure at the end of this section to assure proper operation and slab thickness. Links to setup demonstration videos are also included in the procedure.  Pour direction and finishing direction can have drastic effects on the finish, and should be checked during the dry run and discussed at the meeting. Ideally, the dry run should be performed before the Pre-Pour Meeting and the results discussed at the meeting.
     
    B. Longitudinal Screed
     
    Longitudinal Screeds are rarely used due to limited span length capability and the ease of grading transverse screeds. If a longitudinal screed is proposed to be used, contact the Area Construction Engineer to determine if it is an acceptable application and for assistance with reviewing the setup.
     
    The grade for the screed shall be computed accurately and set in the screed with an engineer’s level or a string line.  The shape of the screed should end up reflecting the vertical alignment of the road where the screed is set.  Computation of screed grades is somewhat complicated for continuous spans when a longitudinal screed is used.  Procedures included in the Engineering Control Section of this Manual are recommended.

     
    When using longitudinal screeds: the first interior bay should be loaded with concrete before loading the overhang.  This procedure will minimize unequal beam deflections.  As soon as the first overhang has been loaded and the deck concrete has been screeded beyond the second beam, the overhang shall be checked for grade.  For full pour simple spans, the grade should be checked with an Engineer's level.  For simple spans with multiple pours and continuous spans, the overhangs should be checked with a “preacher.”  Although the “preacher” does not assure exact final grades, it does assure smooth lines on the overhang.  Details for constructing a “preacher” are included in the aforementioned procedure for grading overhang forms, headers, etc.  If form adjustment is necessary, it should be made immediately.  The other overhang should be checked as soon as it is loaded.

     
    Dry Run Procedure for Transverse Screeds
    1. Screed Rails can be set initially by measuring up a constant distance from the overhang form or the top of the side form, but this is only preliminary.  Final adjustments must be made prior to the dry run.
    2. For more detailed discussion of screed setup see Chapter 4 of the Structures II (CON 815) Manual and view the Transverse Screed Setup videos on YouTube Construction Unit Training playlist.  Before beginning, at all four corners of the screed the distance from the screed rail up to the carriage rail should be the same and the carriage rail should be straightened (Video 1),  the rollers should be aligned (Video 2), and if the bridge is in a crown section, crown can be adjusted into the truss at this point (Video 3).     
    3. The screed should be pulled to the zero buildup location of one exterior girders.  The distance from the buildup to the bottom edge of the front of the drums should be measured.  Both legs on this side of the screed should be adjusted identically until the distance measured is equal to the deck thickness plus the buildup.  This step should be repeated for the other exterior girder.  After this the screed is set to grade (Video 4).  
    4. Begin on one of the exterior girders.  At each 20th point (or 40th or 60th point on longer spans) use the stick constructed in Video 4 to measure up from the top of the girder to the carriage rail.  The carriage should be located as close to the exterior girder line you chose as possible and still allow for easy measurement.  This measurement should equal the calculated buildup.
    5. If the  buildup is greater than the calculated buildup, the screed rail should be lowered until the plan buildup is achieved.  Conversely, if the buildup is less than the plan thickness, the screed rail should be raised until the calculated buildup is achieved. The screed rail is adjusted by turning the nuts located between the top of the side form and the screed rail saddle. 
    6. Steps 4-5 should be repeated for each twentieth point on the exterior girders before checking the interior girders.  Any errors found on the interior girders at that point should be minor variations due to incorrect pan elevations or the arithmetic difference in the plan dead load deflection of the particular interior girder and that of the exterior girder.  
    7. Verify the plan deck thickness from the deck pans to the finish roller and the plan cover over the top mat of rebar.  The tolerance for deck thickness and rebar cover should be +/- 1/8th inch. The thickness and cover should be checked at least every other 20th point (or 40th or 60th point) at the center of the concrete deck panel or SIP form. 
     
     
     
     
     

    ENGINEERING CONTROL - SCREED.png 


     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

  •  
    On December 29, 1970, the Occupational Safety and Health Act of 1970 (Public Law 91-596) was enacted by the Congress. This law, comprehensive in scope authorized the U.S. Secretary of Labor to set mandatory occupational safety and health standards for all construction activities. It also provided that existing federal safety standards already enacted under certain acts and in effect as of April 28, 1971, would become a part of the standards. The Occupational Safety and Health Act of North Carolina vests in the North Carolina Commissioner of Labor the authority and responsibility to administer occupational safety and health standards applicable to most public businesses and private entities. Pursuant to NCGS 95-131 the occupational safety and health standards adopted under the federal Occupational Safety and Health Act of 1970 are adopted as the occupational safety and health regulations applicable to employers in North Carolina. Pursuant to NCGS 95-128 the standards and regulations are applicable to all businesses that are regulated by specific federal laws. Therefore, Contractors performing under any construction contract with the NCDOT are required to comply with all provisions of the North Carolina OSHA regulations.
     
    The assurance that a Contractor complies with the applicable regulations rests with the Department of Labor. Article 107-1 of the Standard Specifications for Roads and Structures requires that the Contractor observes and complies with all laws and regulations.
     
    In order to ensure statewide uniformity in this area of contract administration, the following procedures should be followed: 
     
    1. At the Preconstruction Conference, the Contractor will be reminded that he and all of his Subcontractors are expected to comply with the applicable OSHA regulations and the MUTCD. The Contractor should also be asked to name the employee within the company who is in charge of safety. This name should be recorded in the minutes.  
       
    2. The Department has established emphasis areas to protect Department project personnel from imminent danger situations where serious injury may occur. During the life of the project, the Resident Engineer and each Inspector should especially observe the operations involving emphasis areas with a safety-oriented view. The emphasis areas include fall protection, crane safety, equipment, and excavation protective systems. The pertinent regulations on these emphasis areas are included in this section of the Manual. If the Resident Engineer or Inspectors observe a possible violation of the regulations pertaining to the emphasis areas, the Contractor should be advised to take immediate corrective action. Should the Contractor not take immediate corrective action and Department personnel appear to be in danger, the work should be suspended under the provisions of Article 108-7 of the Standard Specifications. When there is a question of interpretation of the regulations, the situation should be discussed with the Division Engineer before work is suspended. All verbal communications to the Contractor’s personnel should be documented in writing with a copy to the Division Engineer, appropriate Bridge or Roadway Construction Engineer, the Director of Safety and Risk Management, and the State Construction Engineer. If the Contractor disregards the requests to correct possible violations, the Division Engineer and State Construction Engineer should be advised with the full details. If necessary, the State Construction Engineer or the Director of Safety and Risk Management will request a Department of Labor inspection.  
       
    3. If a representative of the Department of Labor makes an inspection on the project, it will be the responsibility of the Resident Engineer and his personnel to cooperate with him as may be necessary. If OSHA wants to open an inspection with DOT, the Safety Engineer should be called to participate.    
    The following is a partial listing of pertinent regulations:
     
    1926.104, 1926.451, 1926.500, 1926.1426 – 503 Fall Protection
     
    Safety railing meeting the requirements of 1926.451 and 1926.500-503 are required on all elevated work surfaces more than 6 feet above ground.
     
    On operations more than 6 feet above the ground, such as setting of structural steel and setting of grades on structural members where the use of other fall protective measures is impractical, fall protection shall consist of the use of safety harnesses and lanyards as allowed by the Standards.
     
    1926.1400, 1926.1501 Crane Safety
     
    Lifting hooks shall be equipped with operable safety latches.
     
    All accessible areas within the swing area of the rotating superstructure of the crane shall be blocked out.
     
    When used to hoist personnel, cranes shall be equipped with controlled load lowering and two block damage prevention devices. Refer to the June 10, 1993, memorandum from L. A. Sanderson to Division Engineers for an explanation of these devices if needed.
     
    Special attention needs to be given to the distances from power lines.
     
    1926.601, 1926.602 Equipment
     
    All equipment with an obstructed view to the rear shall be equipped with an audible backup alarm audible above the surrounding noise level or shall utilize a “spotter” when operated in the reverse mode.
     
    1926.650 – 1926.652, Subpart P Appendix A, B, C, D and F
     
    Open excavations shall be protected as required by the above regulations. This includes excavations such as pipe trench (storm drain and underdrain, and utility), undercut, drainage structure manhole, foundation, and retaining wall. Competent person(s) must be identified.
     
    Manual on Uniform Traffic Control Devices (MUTCD)
     
    The MUTCD provides information for temporary traffic control to include flagger requirements. NCDOL OSH compliance officers review adherence to the MUTCD.
  •  
    Actuation – A registration of demand for right-of-way by traffic to the controller unit.
     
    Antenna - a conductor by which electromagnetic waves are sent out or received over the airways.
     
    Attenuation – The decrease in magnitude of signal power in transmission between points. A term used for expressing the total loss of an optical system, normally measured in decibels (dB) at a specific wavelength.
     
    Backplate – A black metal plate attached to a signal head used to increase the target value of the signal face (used when signal face is not readily visible to motorist due to competing background lighting such as commercial signs and lights, sunlight, etc).
     
    Bandwidth – The range of signal frequencies that a modem or channel will respond to, or carry without excessive attenuation.
     
    Baud – A unit for expressing the rate at which information is transmitted. A rate of one baud is one useful signal element per second.
     
    Bonded - A permanent joining of metallic parts to form an electrically conductive path.
     
    Buffer Tubes – Extruded cylindrical tubes used for protection and isolation encasing optical fibers.
     
    Cabinet – An enclosure for housing the controller and associated equipment.
     
    Cable Bending Radius – The smallest radius bend for a cable that can be made without damaging the cable (as recommended by the manufacturer).
     
    Call – see Actuation
     
    Call Delay – For a detector unit, the ability to delay its output to the controller for a predetermined length of time after a vehicle enters the detection zone. For a controller, the ability to disregard a call from a detector unit for a predetermined length of time.
     
    Cladding – The material surrounding the core of an optical fiber. The cladding keeps the light in the fiber core.
     
    Closed Loop System (CLS) – A signal system in which signals are connected to a master controller. The master controller selects timing patterns for the system, which may be traffic-responsive or time-of-day. The master is connected to a computer in a central office. The computer can be used to monitor the system, make timing changes and receive reports of signal malfunctions.
     
    Coaxial Cable - a cable consisting of an inner insulated core of stranded or solid wire surrounded by an outer insulated flexible wire braid, used esp. as a transmission line for radio-frequency signals.
     
    Condulet – A fitting for attaching two or more pipes (risers) at a junction to allow protection and access of electrical wires and cables.
     
    Conflict Monitor – A device located inside the cabinet (usually separate from controller) that continually checks for the presence of conflicting signal indications. Upon detection of conflicting indications, the conflict monitor will cause the signal to go into flash.
     
    Controller (Signal Controller) – A device which controls the sequence and duration of indications displayed by traffic signals. See also NEMA Controller and Type 170 Controller.
     
    Coordination – A timing relationship between adjacent signals that allows traffic to progress smoothly along a corridor.
     
    Decibel (dB) – Unit for measuring the relative strength of light signals expressed in dB’s.
     
    Demultiplexing – The process of retrieving two or more communication channels from a multiplexed transmission media.
     
    Detection Zone – The area of the roadway where a vehicle will cause actuation.
     
    Dielectric – Non-Metallic and, therefore, non-Conductive. Glass fibers are dielectric. A dielectric cable contains no metallic components.
     
    Emergency Vehicle Preemption – A type of preemption in which the normal signal sequence is interrupted, giving right of way to emergency vehicles (see also Preemption).
     
    Fiber – A thin filament of glass. An optical waveguide consisting of a core and a cladding that is capable of carrying information in the form of light.
     
    Multimode Fiber (MMFO) – A type of optical fiber that supports more than one propagating mode (used primarily for Local Area Networks or other applications that do not cover long distances (i.e., 2 miles or less) – not used on current project designs). The fiber has a core diameter of approximately 62.5 microns.
     
    Single-Mode Fiber (SMFO) – A type of optical fiber in which the signal travels in one mode. The fiber has a small core diameter of approximately 9 microns. Used primarily for communications in transportation applications that may cover longer distances than via MMFO cable.
     
    Fiber Optic Jumper – Optical fiber cable that has connectors installed on both ends.
    Note: The industry Standard utilizes a Yellow jacket for SMFO jumper and an Orange jacket for MMFO jumper.
     
    Fiber Optic Pigtail – Optical fiber cable that has a connector installed on one end.
    Note: The industry Standard utilizes a Yellow jacket for SMFO pigtail and an Orange jacket for MMFO pigtail.
     
    Fiber Optic Receiver – An electronic device that coverts optical signal to electrical signals.
     
    Fiber Optic Splice – An interconnection method for joining the end of one bare fiber to another fiber.
     
    Fusion Splice – A permanent joint produced by the application of localized heat sufficient to fuse the ends of the optical fiber, forming a continuous light signal path.
     
    Mechanical Splice – A method of joining two fibers together by permanent or temporary mechanical means to enable a continuous light signal path.
     
    Fiber Optic Splice Enclosure – A container used to house a cable run splice point, and organize and protect splice trays.
     
    Fiber Optic Splice Tray – A container used to secure, organize, and protect spliced fibers.
     
    Fiber Optic Transceiver – An electronic device that converts optical signals to electrical signals and converts an electrical information-carrying signal to a corresponding optical signal for transmission by fiber. A transceiver is one device consisting of a transmitter and a receiver.
     
    Fiber Optic Transmitter – An electronic device used to convert an electrical information- carrying signal to a corresponding optical signal for transmission by fiber. The transmitter is usually a Light Emitting Diode (LED).
     
    Fiber Optics – Light transmission through optical fibers for communication or signaling.
     
    Free-Run Operation – A mode of operation for a traffic signal in which assignment of right of way indications is governed by demand at the intersection in question, rather than determined by system-wide demand.
     
    Grounded – An electrical connection to the earth to prevent the buildup of unwanted voltage that may result in undue hazards to connected equipment and personnel.
     
    Inductive Loop – A loop of electrical wire placed in the roadway for vehicle detection.
     
    Interconnect Cable – The cable that provides the means to transmit information in a signal system.
     
    Junction Box (Pull Box) – A container usually placed underground with a removable top flush with ground level that serves as a location for splicing loop wire to lead-in wire or to allow for the pulling of cable through conduits.
     
    Lightning Arrestor - a device used on electronic systems (Wireless Radios) to insulate the system from the damaging effect of lightning. The typical lightning arrester, also known as surge arrester, has a high voltage terminal and a ground terminal. When a lightning surge or switching surge travels down the power system to the arrester, the current from the surge is diverted away from the electronic equipment. In most cases the surge is directed to an earth ground path.
     
    Link – A telecommunications circuit between any two telecommunication devices.
     
    Load Switch – An electrical device activated by the controller that turns power on or off for the traffic signal indications.
     
    Loop – see Inductive Loop
     
    Loose Tube Cable – Type of cable design whereby colored fibers are encased in buffer tubes.
     
    Master Controller – A controller which supervises interconnected secondary controllers.
     
    Messenger Cable – see Span Wire
     
    Multiplexing – The combining of several signals into one channel.
     
    Multiplexor (MUX) – A device which uses several communication channels at the same time, transmits and receives messages and controls the communications lines. This device may or may not be a stored program computer.
     
    Optical Time Domain Reflectometer (OTDR) – An instrument that measures transmission characteristics by sending a series of short pulses of light down a fiber and providing a graphic representation of the backscattered light.
     
    Optically Programmed Head – A signal head containing optical units projecting an indication which is selectively masked so as to be visible only within desired viewing boundaries.
     
    Patch panel – A collection of connector panels in a common housing.
     
    Point-to-point – A connection established between two specific locations (such as between two traffic signal controller cabinets).
     
    Preemption- Transfer of the normal control of a signal to a special signal control due to a special situation such as passage of a train or granting of right of way to an emergency vehicle.
     
    Pull Box – see Junction Box.
     
    Quadrupole Loop – An inductive loop design with a longitudinal saw slot along the center of a rectangular loop so that the loop wire can be installed in a figure-eight pattern. These loops are especially useful in the detection of small vehicles.
     
    Radio Frequency - the frequency at which electromagnetic waves are transmitted.
     
    Railroad Preemption – A type of preemption in which the normal signal sequence is interrupted when a train is approaching. Railroad tracks are cleared of vehicles and right of way is granted to vehicle movements that do not conflict with the train movement.
     
    Spanwire - Messenger Cable) – A cable used to support traffic signals heads, electrical cable and/or signs.
     
    Standard Signal Face Clearances – A standard chart that shows how each signal clears from each phase.
     
    Table of Operation – A table that indicates the display for each signal head during each right of way interval.
     
    Trunk – A transmission link joining two points which is distinguished by its large information carrying capacity and by the fact that all signals go from point to point without branching off to any separate drops except at the end points.
     
    Visor (Hood) – That part of the signal head section which shields the lens face from direct light (sunlight).
     
    Wireless Radio - any device that transmits or receives messages or signals by electromagnetic waves.

  •  
     

    WHAT ARE “UTILITY MAKE-READY” PLANS?
     
    Utility Make-Ready Plans are developed to establish a clear right-of-way for the installation of proposed NCDOT communications cables on TIP and non-TIP projects. Mainly this work is associated with the future installation of a communications cable that will be installed underground in a conduit system or overhead/aerial on utility poles.

    ARE THESE PLANS INCLUDED IN THE BID DOCUMENT AND CONSTRUCTION PLANS?
     
    No. They are not included as part of the Bid Document and Construction Plans. The work associated with the Utility Make-Ready plans is not part of work to be performed by the Contractor. Work to be performed as part of the Utility Make-Ready plans is actually work that is to be undertaken by the Utility Companies, and should be handled during the time that the overhead utilities are being re-worked or in some cases re-located.
     
    However, you will find Communications Cable and Conduit Routing Plans in the Construction Plans, which address work that is to be performed by the Contractor.

    WHY DOES NCDOT USE COMMUNICATIONS CABLE?
     
    NCDOT uses communications cable to establish communications media between many different types of electronic devices such as traffic signal controllers, closed circuit television cameras (CCTV Cameras), dynamic message signs (DMS), weather stations, reversible lane systems, metropolitan signal systems, and for communications between Traffic Operation Centers (or Traffic Mgmt. Centers).

    WHAT IS INVOLVED WITH DEVELOPING UTILITY MAKE-READY PLANS?
     
    First, the outer limits of the project are established. In most cases this means establishing the location of all the electronic devices to be interconnected via a specified communications medium. Once the limits are established, a field survey is conducted to record basic field information such as road names, street names, and other vital information. Also, as part of the field survey, information pertaining to the existing overhead utilities is recorded. This includes all existing joint use utility poles and signal poles. Distances between the various poles are recorded along with relative locations of the poles with regards to streets and other landmarks. In addition to recording the pole location, the heights of the existing utilities on each pole are reviewed in the field and recorded. As part of this process, determinations are made as to what utility adjustments (if any) are needed to establish an attachment point. Attachment points on overhead joint use poles are governed by the National Electrical Safety Code (NESC). In some cases this may even mean replacing poles or justifying installing our cable in an underground conduit system.
     
    Once the field survey is completed, the information is placed on a set of Preliminary Utility Make-Ready Plans using the CADD. Next a meeting is established with representatives from the DOT (Transportation Mobility and Safety Division, Division Traffic Engineer/Traffic Services, etc.) and the affected Utility Companies to review the proposed preliminary make-ready work. During this meeting the plans are discussed and any work asked to be performed by the Utility Company is discussed and agreed upon. If alternative solutions are made available the plans are changed to reflect them and a final set of Utility Make-Ready Plans are prepared.
     
    Upon completing the Finalized Utility Make Ready Plans a copy is forwarded to the State Utility Agent, Division Traffic Engineer, Resident Engineer and the Utility Companies.

    WHAT ARE THE REQUIREMENTS OF THE NATIONAL ELECTRICAL SAFETY CODE YOU REFER TO ABOVE?
     
    The National Electrical Safety Code (NESC) is a nationally accepted standard which addresses basic provisions for safeguarding persons from hazards arising from the installation, operation, or maintenance of 1) conductors and equipment in electrical supply station, and 2) overhead and underground electrical supply and communication lines. Communications cable falls under item #2 listed above.
     
    As with many nationally accepted standards, the authority having jurisdiction can make certain exceptions to these rules. This is a very comprehensive document. Therefore, in lieu of trying to explain this document or ask the Resident Engineer to become familiar with this document, we have taken the liberty to include several drawings and tables that address the main guidelines that we meet and/or exceed.
     
    Please reference the “MINIMUM UTILITY CLEARANCE REQUIREMENTS” (see Appendix B) for general attachment guidelines and additional information.

    AS A RESIDENT ENGINEER WHAT DO I DO WITH A SET OF UTILITY MAKE-READY PLANS?
     
    As stated above, the plans indicate work actions that are to be taken by the existing utilities. During the time that the utilities are working to relocate the existing facilities to accommodate the anticipated roadway work, the Utility Companies should also be addressing any work items that are shown on the Departments Utility Make-Ready plans.
     
    The Resident Engineer is advised to become familiar with these plans to help ensure that the utilities are reattaching or making adjustments to the joint use poles to accommodate the future installation of our communications cable. The Resident Engineer must survey the work being performed by the Utility Company to help identify potential problems. Upon completion of Utility Make-Ready work, the Resident Engineer needs to continue to inspect the pole line to ensure that the space allocated for the NCDOT’s cable is maintained. This will go a long way to help eliminate any future problems that may exist when it becomes time for the NCDOT Contractor to install the cable.

    WHAT ARE “COMMUNICATIONS CABLE AND CONDUIT ROUTING PLANS”?
     
    The Communications Cable and Conduit Routing Plans are included as part of the Construction Plans. The work associated with the Communications Cable and Conduit Routing Plans are that portion of the project that the NCDOT Contractor is responsible for performing. The Communications Cable and Conduit Routing Plans may be a stand-alone set of plans in the overall bid package or in other cases be included as part of the Signal Plan Package.
     
    The Communications Cable and Conduit Routing Plans give detailed instruction to the Contractor concerning the installation of the communications cable. These plans take into account the information that was discussed in the Utility Make-Ready Plans and provide additional information regarding where along the project limits to install the communications cable overhead/aerially or underground. They also identify the height and/or location that the communications cable is to be attached.

    WHO DO I CALL WITH QUESTIONS?
     
    For questions or concerns dealing with Utility Make-Ready Plans or Communications Cable and Conduit Routing Plans you should contact the ITS & Signals Engineer of the Transportation Mobility and Safety Division.

  •  
     

    CROSSWALKS AND WHEELCHAIR RAMPS
     
    Maintain the minimum 4-foot clearance between the stopbar and crosswalk. Contact the Engineer in charge of plans if the minimum clearance can not be maintained.

    STOPBARS
     
    Stopbars are placed according to the location specified on the transportation management plan for temporary patterns and on the pavement marking plans for final patterns. The Technician should compare the transportation management plans and pavement marking plans with the signal plans and if a discrepancy is noted, the engineer in charge of the plans should be contacted immediately for a resolution. Stopbars should be located when the curb cuts are being laid out to ensure the curb cuts will be placed in the correct location.

    MODIFICATIONS
     
    • If there are coordination issues between 2 adjacent projects contact the Engineer in charge of the plans.
    • If there is a modification request contact the Engineer in charge of the plans.

    CLOSED LOOP SYSTEM INSPECTION
     
    • Ensure that communications with the intersection controllers and other intersection equipment to the personal computer is through the on-street masters with standard 2-way system communications.
    • Ensure that each intersection actuation (local) detector can be monitored for constant calls and absence of calls.
    • Ensure that each system detector can be monitored for constant calls, absence of calls, and erratic output. Ensure that all such anomalies are reported by the on-street master to the personal computer.
    • Ensure that the on-street masters collect monitoring and detector information from the associated intersections, temporarily store the information, and report the information to the microcomputers.
    • Ensure that on-street master communications equipment performs parity and error checking diagnostics to assure communication of valid system data.
    • The Division Traffic Engineer should be contacted to verify proper closed loop system operation prior to acceptance of the project.
    • Do not accept the project until proper operation of the communications equipment and closed loop system has been verified.

  •  
     

    TRAFFIC SIGNAL SUPPORTS
     
    General
     
    This section is a project special provision. It is important that it be included in the Construction Manual because issues that occur with metal traffic signal supports can cause significant construction-scheduling delays and potential cost overruns. This section provides guidance to Resident Engineers and Technicians to help minimize the potential for problems during construction. Items discussed in this section are based on construction issues and resolutions that have been encountered on NCDOT projects.
     
    Metal signal supports consist of either metal strain poles or metal poles with rigid mounted mast arms. They may be configured at signalized intersections using either metal strain poles, metal poles with mast arms, or a combination of both.
     
    Metal pole standards have been developed and may be shown on signal plans. Some of these standards are on the Qualified Products List. Refer to a Article 1700-2 and follow the Qualified Product List Instructions to determine if they apply to your project.
     
    Construction Methods
     
    • Overhead and underground utilities must be located and verified prior to beginning any work involving metal poles. If conflicts are encountered, the Contractor must gain approval prior to relocating any foundations and determine if the move will affect the structure design, or proper positioning of signals over the roadway. This is critical for metal poles with mast arms and could create costly and time consuming delays if not coordinated or handled in a timely manner. This should be documented in the construction diary in case mitigation is required.
    • The Contractor is required to check that the pole heights required by the plans are of sufficient height to maintain proper signal head clearances for the finished cross-section including the final shoulder slopes. This is a critical milestone. It is highly recommended that the Technician verify the Contractor has performed this check and the Technician should be satisfied that the calculations provide for sufficient height.
    • New roadway projects that have lengthy construction schedules can pose a construction dilemma for a signal Contractor. Metal signal supports typically are installed towards the end of the project. Yet, the signal Contractor must purchase metal signal supports early to ensure adequate shop drawing preparation and pole fabrication time and to receive them at the bid price quoted at the date of advertisement. However, if the roadway has not been constructed, there is no way for the signal Subcontractor to perform field verifications. He either has to assume that the project will be accurately constructed according to the cross-sections or wait until he can perform checks and verifications when final grades are established. The Technician should be aware of this and work closely with the Contractor in the event that final grade elevations vary as this could affect roadway clearances under the structure. Elevation adjustments for the foundations should be considered and allowed in these situations.
    • When metal poles with mast arms are installed early on road widening projects, sometimes the signals have to be repositioned on the mast arm because of traffic shifts during construction. The Technician should instruct the Contractor to field drill wire access holes in the arm only where the final signals will be Contractor positioned. These holes should be drilled on the underside of the mast arm to minimize water from entering and to allow moisture drainage from inside the arm. Additional signal wire should be provided outside of the arm to accommodate signal head shifts during temporary signal configurations.
    • When installing leveling nuts on the foundation anchor bolts prior to setting the pole, consideration should be given to the effect that applied loads such as a mast arm or spanwire tensioning will have on the verticality of the pole. The Contractor may need to adjust the leveling nuts before and after the structure is fully erected and loaded to ensure the vertical tolerances specified are met. Extreme caution should be exercised when making any adjustments to the nuts that secure the structure to the foundation when the structure is in a fully loaded condition.
    • When metal signal supports are erected on foundations, ensure the Contractor follows the Anchor Nut Tightening Specifications, which can be found in Appendix E. When the vertical support is erected, the top and leveling nuts should be fully tightened before installing the arm and /or applying additional loads to the structure. Once the structure has been fully assembled and is in a fully loaded condition, all of the nuts should be rechecked to ensure they are fully tightened. It is important to re-check and verify that all base plate connections are tightened according to the nut tightening procedure no less than 48 hours after the structure is fully erected and loaded. Leveling nuts, particularly ones located on the back side of a newly installed pole or opposite a mast arm or a span wire induced load, often become loose because of the base plate trying to pull away from the leveling nuts. Signal supports should not be accepted until this final check has been performed to the satisfaction of the Technician.
    • The project should not be delayed due to the unavailability of metal signal supports. If metal poles are unavailable when needed, the Contractor should contact the engineer in charge of the project to seek a resolution. This may require installing wood poles on a temporary basis. If metal pole unavailability is not due to the fault of the Contractor, additional compensation for the wood pole installation may be warranted. However, if the unavailability is due to the fault of the Contractor (such as a failure to coordinate his work activities in a timely manner), no compensation should be warranted.

    METAL STRAIN POLES
     
    Metal strain poles are metal poles with messenger cable (spanwire) attached to the poles to suspend traffic signals over the roadway. Strain poles provide a good alternative to wood poles in areas with very limited right-of-way. They are structurally designed for specific loadings and locations. They can be moved around within the general area required by the plans to avoid unanticipated obstacles without compromising their structural stability. However, if they are moved make sure the traffic signal heads still meet visibility and roadway clearance requirements. If a pole needs to be moved a substantial distance, or if the move creates a very acute internal angle between the signal span wires, a structural analysis may be necessary.

    METAL POLES WITH MAST ARMS
     
    Metal poles with mast arms are metal poles with rigid mast arms attached to the poles that support traffic signals and signs over the roadway. Like strain poles, they provide good alternatives to wood poles in areas where right of way is limited. They are best suited for use in areas where high winds are common or in areas where aesthetic appeal is important such as an historic district, urban areas, or in areas where all utilities are underground. Because this type of support is designed site specifically where arm lengths are determined by optimal signal positioning over the roadway, they are not conducive to being relocated from their original design location.

    DRILLED PIER FOUNDATIONS
     
    Drilled pier foundations are steel reinforced concrete piers constructed and cast against undisturbed soil. They vary in size and depth based on the traffic signal structure they are designed to support. Installation methods may vary depending on soil conditions and construction constraints. It is important that the Contractor communicate to the Resident Engineer his proposed method for these installations.
     
    • Soil tests are required for each proposed foundation. The Contractor must submit this information to the engineer responsible for the foundation design. Failure to do so can create delays in the approval of the foundation designs.
    • The Resident Engineer should make every effort to avoid having unsuitable material such as rock and old pavement placed in fill areas where these foundations will be placed. Failure to comply with this could create abnormal soil test results and installation problems for the foundations.
    • It is important that locations where these foundations will be installed (such as built up shoulders and slope embankments) be constructed with proper compaction to help ensure that these drill shafts will not collapse during initial augering.
    • Geotechnical field engineers are available to provide assistance in resolving foundation construction problems. Their input can be crucial to help resolve unanticipated construction issues when unstable or unsuitable material is encountered during construction. 
    For Divisions 1-7 contact:
    The Eastern Regional Operations Engineer
    Eastern Regional Office (Divisions 1-7)         PHONE: (919) 662-4710
    1570 Mail Service Center (MAIL)                         FAX: (919) 662-3095
    Raleigh, NC 27699-1570
    3301 Jones Sausage Rd., Suite 100 (DELIVERY)
    Garner, NC 27529-9489
     
    For Divisions 8-14 contact:
    The Western Regional Operations Engineer
    Western Regional Office (Divisions 8-14)      PHONE: (704) 455-8902
    5253 Z Max Boulevard                                       FAX: (704) 455-8912
    Harrisburg, NC 28075                                        COURIER: 05-37-01

    STRUCTURE DESIGN OF SIGNAL SUPPORTS
     
    This provision is used when the Department’s standard designs are not applicable. This may be due to loading criteria of the signal supports, special decorative or aesthetic requirements, or other unique site specific requirements. The Technician should carefully consult the project plans and Project Special Provision for any unique requirements.
     
    • Under this section, the Contractor is to provide pole and foundation designs for metal strain poles and metal poles with mast arms as specified by the project plans.
    • Fabrication time can be relatively long, ranging from 2 months to 6 months or more. Therefore, it is essential that the Technician encourage the Contractor to submit all required shop drawings as early in the project as possible and that this is recorded in the construction diary.
    • Overhead and underground utilities should be located and verified prior to beginning any work involving metal poles including the design of the structures.
    • The Contractor is required to check that the pole heights required by the plans are of sufficient height to maintain proper signal head clearances for the finished cross-section including the final shoulder slopes prior to submitting shop drawings. This is a critical milestone. It is highly recommended that the Technician verify that the Contractor has performed this check and the Technician also should be satisfied that the calculations provide for sufficient height.

  •  
     


    1757 REMOVAL OF EXISTING TRAFFIC SIGNALS
     
    The Contractor should exercise care during removal so as not to damage other portions of the project or facility. Any damage must be repaired by the Contractor at no additional cost to the Department. Before deactivating the traffic signal, ensure that the required regulatory signs are installed. Signs should be covered until the traffic signal is removed or put into flashing operation. Consult the Division Traffic Engineer to determine if it is necessary to flash the traffic signal before removing the signal equipment.
     
    The Contractor is required to transport the removed signal equipment to the Traffic Services Office. If any equipment is lost or damaged by the Contractor after removal, it must be replaced or repaired at no additional expense to the Department. The Contractor must label all returned equipment and material with its original location.

    ADDITIONAL RESOURCES
  •  
     


    1755 BEACON CONTROLLER ASSEMBLIES
     
    Beacon controller assemblies are also referred to as flashers. Cabinets should be located so as not to obstruct sight distance of vehicles turning on red. Stencil the signal inventory number on the side of the cabinet that faces the roadway. The center of pole mounted cabinets should be approximately 4 feet above grade.

    ADDITIONAL RESOURCES
  •  
     


    1753 CABINET BASE ADAPTER/EXTENDER
     
    Cabinet base adapters and extenders are needed to allow sufficient room for personnel to work inside the traffic signal cabinet and store spare cable. Cabinet base extenders are usually 18 or 24 inches. The cabinet base extenders and adapters should be fabricated out of the same materials and with the same finish as the traffic signal cabinet.

    ADDITIONAL RESOURCES
  •  
     


    1752 MODIFY CABINET FOUNDATIONS
     
    Existing cabinet foundations may be modified by either installing conduit entrances into the foundation or enlarging the existing foundation to accommodate a new cabinet and/or to provide a maintenance technician pad. Any damage to existing conduit, conductors, and anchor bolts must be repaired by the Contractor at no additional expense. A minimum work area of 24” (length) x 30” (width) from both the front and rear doors of the cabinet is required for maintenance technician pads.

    ADDITIONAL RESOURCES
  • RECORDS AND REPORTS

  • NORTHERN LONG-EARED BAT

  •  
     

    NORTHERN LONG-EARED BAT
      
    The US Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) formally listed the Northern Long-Eared Bat (NLEB) as a threatened species under the Endangered Species Act (ESA), and as a result, the rules of conservation of a threatened species became effective May 4, 2015.  The "threatened species" listing of the NLEB affects NCDOT projects statewide with a federal nexus.  The term "federal nexus" applies when a NCDOT project involves federal funding, federal permit or approval, use of federal lands or a federal program.
     
    NCDOT has entered into a programmatic agreement with the USFWS for Divisions 1 through 8 that involves a research and tracking program to establish conclusive information concerning the existence of the NLEB in the eastern part of North Carolina.  Project staff is required to report the number of acres cleared for all projects in these divisions with a federal nexus that were either let prior to May 4, 2015, but not yet accepted or for projects where clearing is completed after May 4, 2015.  Clearing quantities shall include an approximate area of tree canopy determined from project plans, aerial photos or surveying.  For this calculation, a tree is defined as having a trunk of at least a 3 inch diameter at chest height.  Report the estimated acres of clearing on the project after completion of clearing activities, (which is preferred) but no later than the project acceptance.
     
    A Biological Surveys project site has been developed in SharePoint under the Construction Projects team site for submission and reporting of the tree clearing for Divisions 1 through 8.  Complete the standard form for the NLEB to record the required information of contract number, TIP number(s), WBS number, county, project description, acreage of tree clearing, completion date of clearing, the acceptance date of project completion, and funding source.  The Biological Survey reporting form may be accessed using the following steps.
     
    1. Go to Your Team Sites on Connect and select “Construction Projects.”
       
    2. Select “Biological Surveys” Team Site.
       
    3. Under Northern Long-Eared Bat select “new item”.
       
    4. Complete the required reporting information and select “Save”. (Note: If the tree clearing is reported prior to the acceptance date, the “Accepted Project Completion Date” is not required.)

  •  
    Examples have been included to assist the Resident Engineer’s office in preparing and utilizing pay record books, estimate work books and partial payment cross reference systems.
     
    The format of the examples provided closely simulates pay record and estimate work book entries. These examples document any appropriate information that should be included for each type of pay item. These examples are not mandatory requirements and should be utilized as guides in recording entries involving roadway and structure pay items in pay record and estimate work books. The Resident Engineer and staff should use these examples and good judgment when documenting any pay item.
     
    The partial payment cross reference system included in the examples provides only one way of documenting specific partial payments to the Contractor by item and estimate number. The Resident Engineer should utilize this example and good judgment in documenting and cross referencing all partial payments made to the Contractor. This example system also provides an easy method to track the over/underruns of each individual pay item during the construction of the project.
     
    The following are examples of typical Pay Record Book, Estimate Work Book and Partial Payment Cross Reference System entries:
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     

  •  
    The Department allocates funding to Local Government Agencies (LGA) provided through the federal government (primarily the Federal Highway Administration (FHWA) and/or the state government, which is appropriated by the NC General Assembly. A LGA may be a municipality, county, state agency or a non-profit organization. The funds allocated to a LGA are used to construct a transportation project or deliver a transportation program. These projects are known as locally administered projects. NCDOT includes locally administered projects in the 5-Year Work Plan to receive federal or state funding based on recommendations of Municipal or Rural Planning Organizations, NCDOT staff and Board of Transportation Members. 
     
    The Department’s Transportation Program Management - Local Programs Management Office (LPM Office) is the contact for NCDOT with the LGA. The LPM Office establishes policy and procedures for the projects administered by a Local Government Agency and is responsible for the overall compliance of applicable state and federal regulations regarding these projects. The Local Programs Management Office works with the LGA from programming the project in the 5-Year Work Plan to the construction phase of the project, and is responsible for obtaining execution of the Project Agreement. The Project Agreement outlines the description and scope of the project, funding participation, the completion dates of the preconstruction and construction phases, provisions concerning the environmental document, design, right of way, construction administration, construction, maintenance, the terms of reimbursement and the reporting requirements. 
     
    The LGA is responsible for the design, construction and the contract administration of the project, and the Department is responsible for the project oversight to ensure that the project is constructed in accordance with the NCDOT Standard Specifications for Roads and Structures and the funds are expended appropriately and within the amounts established in the Project Agreement. The LGA will perform the daily contract administration duties such as project reviews, project documentation, materials sampling and testing, Disadvantaged Business Enterprise/Minority Business Enterprise/Women Business Enterprise compliance reporting and submission of project invoices. Supplemental agreements and claims granting additional compensation, which the LGA wants to consider for reimbursement through state or federal funding , must have prior concurrence from the Department. The LGA shall notify the Department of any claims, supplemental agreements or work beyond the scope of the original agreement and provide the required documentation for review and concurrence. The Department’s review and concurrence is to determine if the subject work is eligible for funding reimbursement. Approval authority remains with the LGA. 
     
    During the construction phase, the Department’s Division personnel will act as the primary contact with the LGA. Communication between the Division and the Local Programs Management Office should be maintained throughout the construction phase. The Local Programs Management Office should be notified of the following.
     
    • LGA begins construction
    • Any change order that requires the amendment of the Original Project Agreement
    • Changes to funding or milestone (completion) dates
    • Notice of project acceptance 
    The Department has developed an oversight plan for the construction phase of locally administered projects. The plan is attached and it outlines the duties of Division personnel, Construction Unit field engineers and the LGA.
     
    Locally Administered Construction Oversight Guidelines
     
    Division Construction Engineer (DCE) Duties
     
    • Prior to preconstruction conference, review any Professional and Engineering Service Agreements for conformance with Department procedures. Ensure that the Professional Management Services Unit of the Division of Technical Services reviews agreements with Private Engineering Firms (PEFs) to provide Construction Engineering and Inspections (CEI) services.
    • PEFs that perform design work for the project may not be utilized to perform CEI services. Local Agencies may request an exemption to this policy. Exemptions may be approved depending on the scope of work. Local Agencies should submit their request for an exemption to the Local Programs Management Office (LPMO) for review. LPMO will coordinate approval with the State Construction Engineer.
    • PEFs must be prequalified to perform CEI services.
    • NCDOT Certified Technicians must be provided to test and inspect items of work that require sampling, testing and inspecting by certified technicians (i.e. concrete, asphalt, densities). This applies to projects administered by PEF or Local Government Agency (LGA) staff.
    • Review reporting requirements at the preconstruction conference.
    • Prior to beginning work, review contract administration requirements and financial status (remaining balance of Agreement amount) with the LGA.
    • Assign a DOT representative to provide project oversight.
    • Monitor expenditures – Construction and CEI – and advise LGA in writing if the Agreement amount is exceeded or is anticipated to be exceeded.
    • Review for concurrence claims and Supplemental Agreements in accordance with the Department’s established thresholds. The Department’s review and concurrence is to determine if the subject work is eligible for funding reimbursement. Approval authority remains with the LGA.
    • Final inspection and written notice to LGA of required corrective work.
    • Final review of project records to determine conformance with required procedures prior to final reimbursement.
    • Ensure all commitments for the project have been removed in SAP after final payment or completion of the verified claim process. Check the status of commitments using the SAP function code ZPSR01.
    • Complete Form 1446B** (FHWA Final Acceptance Report) and the 1446B Checklist. Attach invoices for all charges, copy of final payment, a list of supplemental agreements and a list of time extensions, if applicable. Forward this package to the State Materials and Tests Engineer for material certification.
    • The Division Contract Administrator should check the status of payment of the Final Voucher** using SAP transaction code ZF22. The date of the payment of the final voucher will begin the period for retention of project records. See the Retention and Storage of Project Records and Documents in Records and Reports, for additional information about retention of records. 
    Resident Engineer (RE) or other DOT Representative Duties
      
    • Attend Preconstruction Conference.
    • Attend Monthly Construction and other regularly scheduled construction meetings.
    • Ensure that the private engineering firm used to perform construction administration is prequalified to perform Construction Engineering and Inspection by NCDOT. Also, ensure technicians who perform sampling and testing for project acceptance possess the appropriate certifications.
    • Ensure that exemption has been approved if the proposed firm performing CEI Services also provided design services for the project.
    • Review project as needed but a minimum of monthly. A monthly report shall be prepared and sent to the responsible agency documenting the following contract elements.
    • Pay record documentation.
    • Weigh Tickets.
    • Daily inspection reports.
    • Disadvantaged Business Enterprise/Minority Business Enterprise/Women Business Enterprise participation and tracking.
    • Materials received documentation.
    • Minimum sampling and testing of materials.
    • Certified Payroll submittal. **
    • Contract change documentation – Supplemental Agreements and Claims - For Supplemental Agreements, the RE / DOT Representative shall review the Project Agreement to verify that the supplemental work is within the original scope of work and to ensure funding is available for the change order. The Local Programs Management Office shall be contacted if an amendment to the agreement or a change in funding is necessary.
    • Documentation of penalties / acceptance as reasonably close conformance.
    • Review for concurrence all claims and Supplemental Agreements in accordance with the Department’s established thresholds. Concurrence with Supplemental Agreements required prior to beginning the supplemental work. The Department’s review and concurrence is to determine if the subject work is eligible for funding reimbursement. Approval authority remains with the LGA.
    • Enter submitted DBE-IS forms into SAP.
    • Process invoices submitted by the LGA for reimbursement.
    • Final project review – schedule DCE for final inspection, when appropriate. 
    Roadway Construction Engineer / Bridge Construction Engineer Duties
     
    • Provide reporting and contract administration training upon request from DCE or RE.
    • Perform audits to supplement RE reviews – every three (3) months.
    • Report results of audits to Division Engineer.
    • Review Claims and Supplemental Agreements in accordance with the Department’s established thresholds.
    • Perform final inspection, when requested by the DCE. 
    Area Materials Engineer or other Materials and Tests Representative
     
    • Attend the Preconstruction Conference.
    • Perform random material audits including ensuring approved sources are used, proper certifications are received, received material quantities equal paid quantities of materials.
    • Perform random reviews for proper sampling and testing procedures.
    • Provide guidance for receipt, acceptance, payment of materials and compliance with all materials related specification and standards. 
    Local Government Agency Duties
     
    • Schedule Preconstruction Conference with the Contractor, DCE, RE, M&T Area Materials Specialist and other interested parties.
    • Provide daily contract administration.
    • Provide project documentation in accordance with the Department’s policy and procedures and in accordance with Federal regulations.*
    • Ensure that the private engineering firm utilized for construction administration is prequalified to perform Construction Engineering and Inspection by NCDOT. Also, ensure the technicians who perform the sampling testing for project acceptance possess the appropriate certifications.
    • Ensure Disadvantaged Business Enterprise/Minority Business Enterprise/Women Business Enterprise compliance. Submit DBE-IS forms with invoices to document Disadvantaged Business Enterprise/Minority Business Enterprise/Women Business Enterprise program compliance.
    • Contact RE or DOT Representative when Supplemental Agreements or Claims need review and approval.
    • Contact RE or DOT Representative prior to performing any work outside the original scope of the project or when there are questions regarding the Department’s policy and procedures.
    • Present project invoices to the RE or other assigned Division staff for reimbursement of costs as included in the Project Agreement. Invoices should include all appropriate documentation and project records to support the invoice payment request.
    • The Local Government Agency is required to submit a Letter of Certification to the NCDOT State Materials Engineer certifying that the materials incorporated in the construction work were in conformity with all applicable standards, specifications and plans. For more information regarding the Letter of Certification, see "Local Government Agency Administered Contracts – Letter of Certification by Licensed Professional Engineer" later in this section. 
    **Note: The FHWA 1446B process, Final Vouchers, and submittal of Certified Payrolls only apply to projects that receive federal funding.
     
    *Exceptions for Locally Administered Greenway and Multi-Use Path Projects
     
    Note: The following exceptions listed herein do not apply to portions of the greenway or multi-use path project that contain bridge or pedestrian culvert construction components or retaining walls greater than 10’.
     
    • Daily inspection reports are not required but recommended. The LGA must have a properly NCDOT certified inspector when placing concrete, aggregate base course, and asphalt. An inspector must also be present when traffic is impacted by lane closures or work is performed adjacent to a travel way.
    • Daily Asphalt Reports are not required.
    • Physical measurements must be recorded for any line item paid in units. Pay record documentation should be kept by Line Item and in a format that is easily reviewed.
    • Weigh tickets are required for materials paid by the ton. Weigh Tickets should be received and maintained by Line Item and kept in date order.
    • Measurements must also be recorded for lump sum contracts in order to document the quantity of work accomplished.
    • The Local Government Agency is required to submit a Letter of Certification to the NCDOT State Materials Engineer certifying that the materials incorporated in the construction work were in conformity with all applicable standards, specifications and plans.
    • Refer to the Modified Minimum Sampling Guide (MSG) for Greenways and Multi-Use Paths on the following page for guidance regarding minimum sampling requirements. 
    Local Government Agency Administered Contracts - Letter of Certification by Licensed Professional Engineer
     
    The responsible licensed Professional Engineer, designated by the county or municipality administering the contract and agreed upon by the Department’s designee assigned to oversee the contract administration, shall submit a letter to the State Materials Engineer certifying that the materials incorporated in the construction work, and the construction operations controlled by sampling and testing were in conformity with all applicable standards, specifications and plans. This shall include but is not limited to NCDOT Standard Specifications for Roads and Structures, NCDOT Special Provisions, NCDOT Standard Drawings and the NCDOT Minimum Sampling Guide. The Engineer must also verify and certify that all sampling and testing was conducted by technicians who hold current appropriate NCDOT certifications for the applicable testing and inspections they performed on the project. Any exceptions or shortages in required number of tests shall be noted in a separate attachment to the letter and may be deemed as non-participatory by the State Materials Engineer.
     
    The State Materials Engineer or designee will complete the project certification process with the NCDOT Federal Funds Management Unit and the Federal Highway Administration. Random project record audits may be performed to insure compliance with all applicable standards and may designate any irregularities, deficiencies or non-compliances as non-participatory.  

  •  
    The Construction Quality Index (CQI) Evaluation is an evaluation of all centrally let contracts with the exception of resurfacing contracts. This evaluation provides a mechanism to determine if there are specific construction elements that are causing maintenance related issues after the final acceptance of a project. The evaluation also provides a method to identify potential needed changes to the standard design details or specifications.
     
    The CQI evaluation review should be performed approximately 10 months after the acceptance of a project. (This review should coincide with the 12 Month Project Guarantee review for those projects that require both reviews). The CQI reviews are performed by the Division Construction Engineer (DCE), Division Maintenance Engineer (or assigned delegate), Resident Engineer and the Roadway and/or Bridge Construction Engineers. Each person reviewing the project should evaluate the project individually and record your ratings on the Construction Quality Index Evaluation Form. The DCE is responsible for averaging the individual evaluations and submitting one composite evaluation for each contract to the Construction Unit.
     
    The Construction Quality Evaluation Form and its guidelines can be found in HiCAMS, Click on Project Closeout under Functions.

  •  
    All centrally let contracts with the exception of resurfacing contracts contain a 12 Month Project Guarantee provision, following the project acceptance date. The Contractor is responsible for any defects in the materials or workmanship of the major components of the project for a 12 month period. Examples of the major components include pavement structures, bridge components and sign structures. Near the end of the 12 month period, the Department will review the project to determine if the project guarantee needs to be invoked. When a partial acceptance is made for completed items of work prior to the final project acceptance, the 12 month period begins on the date of partial acceptance for those items included in the partial acceptance. Below are the procedures for administering the 12 Month Project Guarantee provision.
     
    The Division Construction Engineer and the Resident Engineer will receive a HiCAMS notification both two months and one month prior to the expiration of the guarantee (if the Resident Engineer has set the guarantee indicator and appropriate guarantee time frame during the contract activation process and entered the acceptance date in HiCAMS in a timely manner.) The Division Construction Engineer and the Resident Engineer are responsible for performing review with the following personnel (as applicable), the Bridge/Roadway Construction Engineer, a representative from the District Engineer’s Office and a representative from Division Bridge Maintenance.
     
    Notifications shall be given to the Contractor whether or not corrective action is required (See Sample No Corrections Letter). When remedial work is necessary related to the guarantee, the Resident Engineer will notify the Contractor by Certified Mail prior to the expiration date of the guarantee, detailing the items to be corrected (See Sample Corrections Letter). If the Contractor disputes any of the items of the work requested, he is required to provide a written description of the disputed work with a detailed explanation to the Division Engineer. After the review of the Contractor’s submission of information, if the Division Engineer intends to pursue the repairs under the term of the guarantee, the Division Engineer shall forward the information to the State Construction Engineer. The State Construction Engineer will review the information and provide a written response, on behalf of the Chief Engineer, to the Division Engineer for further handling of the necessary repairs.
     
    Once all the repairs have been made, the Division Construction Engineer will make a final review of the repairs and send a letter to the Contractor, with a copy to the State Construction Engineer, indicating that all repairs have been made and the project guarantee has been satisfied.  

  •  
    These procedures establish a uniform system of handling project records after completion of a project. The Resident Engineer will maintain project files during the course of the project in accordance with procedures included in this subsection of the Manual. The Final Estimate Assembly will be prepared and submitted in accordance with the procedures in this section of the Manual.
     
    The following procedures for retention and storage of project records will be used on all projects:
     
    1. Resident Engineer's Files: After submission of the final estimate assembly, the Resident Engineer should hold the remaining portion of the project files until the State Construction Engineer notifies the Division Engineer to process all affected project records. At this time, the Resident Engineer will process records as follows:
       
      1. Non federally-funded projects:
         
        1. The project files will be submitted to the Division office to be screened and merged with the Division’s project files. 
           
        2. Project work books not included in transmission of the final estimate shall be retained in the Resident Engineer's office for one year after the notification from the State Construction Engineer and then destroyed. 
      2. Federally-funded projects: 
        1.  
        2. The project files will be submitted to the Division office to be screened and merged with the Division’s project files. 
           
        3. Project work books not included in transmission of the final estimate assembly will be bound together and submitted to the Division office for storage for a period of at least three years after payment of the final voucher by the Federal Highway Administration.
    2. Division Engineer's File: The State Construction Engineer will notify the Division Engineer when the project records are to be processed in accordance with the procedure for retention and storage of records. Upon receipt of records from the Resident Engineer, the following procedures should then be applied to all state and federally-funded projects: 
       
      1. The Division Engineer's file will be combined with the file received from the Resident Engineer and all duplications eliminated. 
         
      2. The composite file will then be sent to Highway Records Section in Raleigh for further handling.
    The Division Engineer may at his discretion maintain a skeleton reference file containing items, such as the contract, as-built plans, estimates, and correspondence documenting unusual circumstances or conditions. Any encroachment contracts should be removed from this file and placed in a separate file for reference and administrative purposes.

  •  
     

    GENERAL
     
    Federally funded contracts are required to be accepted by the Federal Highway Administration (FHWA) to enable the Department to be reimbursed for project expenditures. For most projects the FHWA has delegated the Department the authority to complete the FHWA Final Acceptance Report (Form 1446B) for submission. For projects designated as full oversight, (step by step) FHWA retains approval of this process. Therefore, upon final payment of a delegated federally funded contract, a completed Form 1446B and 1446B Checklist, which includes project description information and pertinent dates, should be submitted to the FHWA.
     
    Federally funded contracts are administered differently and the final voucher process differs a little for each type of administration. The administration of each contracts are categorized by the type of letting which is listed below along with the final voucher process.

    CENTRALLY LET FEDERALLY FUNDED CONTRACTS
     
    After the final estimate has been paid and a verified claim is not anticipated or the verified claim process (including mediation and lawsuit) has been completed, the State Construction Engineer should ensure that all commitments for the project are removed in the NCDOT fiscal accounting system, SAP. Check the status of commitments using the SAP function ZPSR01.
     
    Once all commitments have been removed, the State Construction Engineer will complete Form 1446B and the 1446B Checklist in HiCAMS. The State Construction Engineer will forward the completed form and checklist (in HiCAMS) to the State Materials Engineer for the materials certification. The instructions for completing Form 1446B and the 1446B Checklist are in the HiCAMS User Guide - Manual Topic 13 “Project Closeout”.
     
    Once the materials certification is complete, the State Materials Engineer will complete the certification portions of Form 1446B and the 1446B Checklist and forward both to the North Carolina Department of Transportation – Federal Funds Management Unit (FFMU) to process for FHWA reimbursement (final voucher.) The Division Contract Administrator can check the status of payment of the final voucher using SAP transaction code ZF22. The date of the payment of the final voucher will begin the period for retention of project records. See the Retention and Storage of Project Records and Documents in this section for additional information about retention of records.

    DIVISION LET FEDERALLY FUNDED CONTRACTS
     
    After the final estimate has been paid and a verified claim is not anticipated or the verified claim process (including mediation and lawsuit) has been completed, the Division Engineer should ensure that all commitments for the contract are removed in the NCDOT fiscal accounting system, SAP. Check the status of commitments using the SAP function ZPSR01.
     
    Once all commitments have been removed, the Division Engineer (or delegate) will complete Form 1446B and the 1446B Checklist in HiCAMS. The Division Engineer will forward the completed form and checklist (in HiCAMS) to the State Materials Engineer for the materials certification. The instructions for completing Form 1446B and the 1446B Checklist are in the HiCAMS User Guide - Manual Topic 13 “Project Closeout”.
     
    Once the materials certification is complete, the State Materials Engineer will complete the certification portions of Form 1446B and the 1446B Checklist and forward both to the North Carolina Department of Transportation – Federal Funds Management Unit (FFMU) to process for FHWA reimbursement (final voucher.) The Division Contract Administrator can check the status of payment of the final voucher using SAP transaction code ZF22. The date of the payment of the final voucher will begin the period for retention of project records. See the Retention and Storage of Project Records and Documents in this section for additional information about retention of records.

    LOCALLY ADMINISTERED, FEDERALLY FUNDED CONTRACTS
     
    After the final estimate has been paid and a verified claim is not anticipated or the verified claim process (including mediation and lawsuit) has been completed, the Division Engineer should ensure that all commitments for the contract are removed in the NCDOT fiscal accounting system, SAP. Check the status of commitments using the SAP function ZPSR01.
     
    Once all commitments have been removed, the Division Engineer should complete and sign Form 1446B and attach the 1446B Checklist and a copy of the final estimate. (Please note that Form 1446B and the 1446B Checklist for Locally Administered, Federally Funded Contracts are to be completed outside of HiCAMS. These forms can be assessed for the Construction Unit web page under Construction Resources.) This package should be forwarded to the State Materials Engineer for the materials certification. Upon completion of the materials certification, the State Materials Engineer will sign the Form 1446B and send the completed package to the North Carolina Department of Transportation - Federal Funds Management Unit (FFMU) to process for FHWA reimbursement (final voucher.) The Division Contract Administrator can check the status of payment of the Final Voucher using SAP transaction code ZF22. The date of the payment of the final voucher will begin the period for retention of contract records. See the Retention and Storage of Project Records and Documents in this section, for additional information. The Division Engineer should notify the Local Government Agency of the voucher dated by certified letter.

  • Project Acceptance
      
    After completion of all items of work, a final inspection of the project is held. Division personnel are responsible for scheduling the final inspection and acceptance of the project. The Construction Unit Area Bridge or Roadway Engineer may also attend, upon request. Once the final inspection is held and all recommendations are complete, the Division should notify the Contractor of final acceptance of the project.  
     
    Active and Final Claims:
     
    The Division Engineer has the final approval authority for both "active" and "final" claims. Upon request, the Construction Unit will review and respond to final claims for Division let projects. The Construction Unit should be consulted for review of all claims and supplemental agreements that exceed $50,000. The Resident Engineer or other project administrator should provide a written response for all active claims. The Division Engineer should provide a written response to the Contractor indicating the claim decisions for final claims. More detail regarding this letter is provided below.
     
    Processing the Final Estimate:
     
    The Resident Engineer or other project administrator will prepare the final estimate assembly and send it to the Division for final review prior to processing the final estimate.
     
    (Note that final estimate assemblies or other documents normally sent to the Construction Unit for centrally let projects should not be sent to the Construction Unit for Division Let Contracts. This holds true for Division Let projects handled as a Purchase Order Contracts or set up in HiCAMS as "D" projects.)
     
    Once the Division reviews the final estimate, the Division should send the Contractor a Notification of Final Quantities letter by certified mail. The Notification of Final Quantities letter notifies the Contractor of the final quantities, the assessment of any liquidated damages, if any are assessed, and requests the final project documents in accordance with Article 109-10; Consent of Surety, if required, Affidavit and Final Claim letter or letter of no final claim. The Consent of Surety is not required if a bond was not required for a contract. If the project is a low risk project, such as a sidewalk extension, you do not need to get the final documents. Examples of the Consent of Surety and Affidavit should be attached to the Notification of Final Quantities letter and may be found on the Construction Unit's web page under Project Closeout.
     
    The final documents should be sent to the Division and not the Construction Unit and retained with the project files at the Division. The Division should allow time for the Contractor to review the quantities and resolve any disputed items.
     
    A Closeout Conference may be held with the Contractor to resolve outstanding project issues. If all of the outstanding project issues are resolved at a Closeout Conference, the Division Engineer (or his designee) should complete the Division Closeout Conference Form.
     
    Both the Contractor and the Division Engineer should sign and date the Division Closeout Conference Form. Note that this form will then serve as the final claim letter. In addition, the Contractor waives his rights to file a verified claim if a Division Closeout Conference Form was signed stating his agreement that all issues were resolved. If ALL of the outstanding project issues are not resolved, then the Contractor should not sign the Division Closeout Conference Form and should proceed with filing a final claim. If ALL issues are not resolved, but some were resolved the Division should complete a Claim Resolution Form (Form CFR-D) and enter the resolved issues in HiCAMS as an active claim(s) and the Contractor may proceed with filling a final claim. 
     
    The Division's written review of the final claim is a Payment of Final Estimate letter that should include justification of the Division's decisions for all final claim issues, and a copy of the statement of final estimate, and a copy of General Statute 136-29 (Verified Claim information), which can be found on the Construction Unit’s web page under Project Closeout.
     
    This letter should be sent to the Contractor after the Final Estimate has been processed in HiCAMS. 
     
    Prior to processing the final estimate, verify payments have been made to the committed Disadvantaged Business Enterprise firms in accordance with the contract commitments. Use the DBE/MBE/WBE Subcontract Commitment Payment Summary form to document if the Contractor satisfactorily fulfilled his commitments.
     
    Once the Division Engineer is satisfied that all issues have been resolved, the final estimate checked, DBE payments have been verified and the final documents have been received, the final estimate should be processed. Documentation of all final claims or Closeout Conferences shall be entered in HiCAMS as a "Final Claim," with the Division's decision (Recommendation in HiCAMS).
     
    After processing the final estimate, the Division Engineer should send the Contractor by certified mail the Payment of Final Estimate letter with a copy of the final estimate statement and the procedures for filing a verified claim. Example letters can be seen in the project Closeout Process for Division and Locally Administered Federal Funded Projects Webinar (March 24, 2011) located on the Construction Unit’s web page (web address is provided below.) If the Contractor files a verified claim on the project, he must do so within 60 days following receipt of the final statement. The certified mail receipt date documents the beginning of the 60-day time frame for filing a verified claim.
     
    List of Letters
     
    The following letters were discussed in the project closeout process and examples of each can be found in the Project Closeout Process for Division and Locally Administered Federal Funded Projects Webinar (March 24, 2011) located on the Construction Unit’s web page under Project Closeout.
     
    • Final Acceptance of Project
    • Notification of Final Quantities
    • Final Claim Review
    • Positive Estimate with no final claim
    • Zero Estimate with no final claim
    • Overpayment Letter 

  •  
    Although design build (DB) projects are bid differently than bid build projects, the required documentation and project certification remains much the same. In addition to the progress schedule, narrative, etc. that are required for all projects, DB projects require a Schedule of Values, a Table of Quantities, and an Estimated Payout Submittal. These documents provide additional information for use in establishing funding levels, preparation of monthly estimates, materials tracking and project certification. These required documents are outlined below.
     
    Contract administration of DB projects through HiCAMS is unique in that partial payments are made to generally one line item set up for the contract. Additional line items may be established throughout the life of the contract for Supplemental Agreements, AC and Fuel Adjustments, Penalties, etc. The current HiCAMS User Guide for Design Build Contracts should be reviewed for additional assistance. Materials tracking in HiCAMS for a DB contract is administered through work items. Work items are established from the Table of Quantities supplied by the contractor and are entered as such in HiCAMS. From the work items, queries can be generated to monitor and track materials used and work accomplished for monthly pay estimates and project certification. Although the project is paid as a lump sum for the work bid, it is still imperative that materials be tracked and that proper sampling be performed as required in the Minimum Sampling Guide. Having a lump sum bid amount does not relieve the Department from making monthly payments based on work accomplished to date or from project certification requirements.
     
    A project set up meeting should be scheduled for DB projects to ensure the contractor has supplied the required documents outlined below and to ensure that the project is set up properly in HiCAMS. The meeting should include the Resident Engineer (RE) and staff, Materials and Tests representatives, Roadway Construction/Bridge Construction Engineer and any others that may be needed.
     
    Required Documents:
     
    Progress Schedule – The progress schedule shall be submitted by the Design Build Team (DBT) within 30 calendar days of receiving the Notice of Award. The Department will review the progress schedule within 21 calendar days or receipt. The DBT shall make any necessary corrections and adjustments to the progress schedule as required by the Department’s review within 7 calendar days and the Department will review the revised progress schedule within 7 calendar days of receipt. The progress schedule shall also include a written narrative in accordance with the specifications.
     
    Schedule of Values – A Schedule of Values is a schedule of work items necessary to complete the work, along with the progress of each work item, primarily for the purpose of partial payments. The Schedule of Values shall be submitted within 30 days of the date of award. Each item shall be assigned a cost and a quantity. The Schedule of Values shall be revised with each update to the progress schedule as described in Article 108-2 of the Specifications, as revised by the contract Standard Special Provisions.
     
    Table of Quantities – A Table of Quantities is a listing of work items (corresponding to the items in the Trns*port pay item list) that contributes to a project completion. The table shall include estimated quantities for each work item. The Table of Quantities shall be submitted within 30 days of the date of award. A Certified Table of Quantities shall be submitted with each pay request and shall indicate that the information accurately represents the materials used for the work performed for which payment is requested. The Table of Quantities shall be updated and resubmitted within 14 days of when a set of plans is sealed as RFC Plans and whenever there are substantial changes to the quantities on previously incorporated RFC plans.
     
    Estimated Payout Submittal - The Estimated Payout Submittal is used to establish monthly funding levels and is to be submitted by the 6th day after opening of the Price Proposal. This is to be updated on the 15th of March, June, September and December of each year. This is not to be used for monthly payment purposes.
     
    Materials and Monthly Estimates:
     
    Receiving Materials – Materials incorporated into the project must be received for DB projects just as they are for other projects including tickets, bills of lading, alternate ID lists, invoices, certifications, etc. Tickets entered for work items are automatically checked “Do Not Pay – Other Payment Method” and this eliminates the possibility of double paying the contractor. Since ticket books are entered as “Do Not Pay”, queries will be utilized to obtain quantities used to calculate AC and Fuel Adjustments.
     
    Processing of Monthly Estimates – The processing of monthly estimates for DB projects differs from other projects, in that payments are entered as a percentage of the line item established for the lump sum bid amount, based on quantities of work items that have been accomplished for the month, as submitted by the contractor and verified by the Department. The Resident Engineer’s staff should maintain Monthly Estimate Books (MEB) for tracking the work performed in the same manner that Pay Record Books are maintained for other projects. Other Pay Record Books shall be maintained for the Lump Sum Bid Amount as well as for supplemental agreements and other line items that may be added. Ticket books for direct payment work items should be separated from incidental ticket books for the lump sum item and submitted with final documentation. The quantities and locations of materials used should be recorded in the MEB’s as work is performed. The Technicians and Contractor’s personnel should compare and agree to the quantities of work performed prior to the Contractor submitting a Pay Request based on the Schedule of Values. The amount paid on a Monthly Estimate will be derived from the verified Pay Request submitted by the Contractor based on the work accomplished as detailed in the certified Table of Quantities. The dollar amount of work submitted is divided by the Lump sum amount per line item, and rounded to three places for HiCAMS pay record entry. The payment amount calculated by multiplying the pay record quantity times the Lump Sum amount generally does not exactly match the requested payment amount. These discrepancies resolve when the payment amounts total 1.000 Lump Sum.
     
    AC/Fuel Adjustments – AC and Fuel adjustments must be calculated manually outside of HiCAMS. The calculated dollar amount paid or deducted is entered as a pay record against line items added using the “Review Other Line Items” function. Penalty line items, except for Density failures, are added by the Construction Unit.
     
    Materials Certification – Upon completion of the project, the contractor shall submit a certified final Table of Quantities along with the final As Constructed Plans for the project. These certified final quantities will be used as a basis for ensuring that the minimum sampling has been performed for project certification.
     
    Miscellaneous Items:
     
    Subcontract Agreement Forms (SAF) – The contractor is required to submit the SAFs for DB projects as for any other project. Even though there is only one line item for the contract and the SAF is entered in HiCAMS as a partial items of work; the SAF should include a breakdown of the work items and values for each item of work to be performed by the subcontractor. This information can be used for DBE tracking purposes, negotiations during supplemental agreements, etc. When the SAF is entered in HiCAMS, generally only one item will be entered as a percentage of the lump sum bid amount for Design and Construction. The work items for which the subcontractor is performing should be noted in the Comments section of the HiCAMS entry. This will identify the work being performed especially for committed items for DBE/MB/WB firms.
     
    DBE/MB/WB Tracking – The same tracking and monitoring of DBE/MB/WB participation is required for DB projects as for other projects. Typically at the time of bid, only a dollar value may be shown for each committed subcontractor. As noted previously, the contractor should submit on the SAF the individual work items from the Table of Quantities that the firm is committed to perform. The quantities shown on the SAF should be used to ensure compliance of the DBE/MB/WB Special Provisions. Since the item is entered as a percentage of the lump sum item, the Standard Report entitled DBE Payment Report in HiCAMS will not give an accurate value of the work performed by the DBE for comparison to the payments reported in the Payment Tracking database. Therefore, tracking will have to be performed manually by comparing the latest pay request from the contractor to what has been entered in the database.
     
    As-Constructed Plans:
     
    From the Released for Construction Plans or Revised Released for Construction Plans, the Design-Build Team must prepare and submit As-Constructed Plans for the project. The plans must be submitted to the Resident Engineer as an electronic file in the Portable Document Format (PDF).
     
    The following are requirements for various sheets of the As-Constructed Plans. The sheets are listed in the order they should appear in the As-Constructed Plans:
     
    1. Cover Sheet: This should be Sheet Number 1 of this portion of the assembly. Page numbers should be shown in the upper right hand corner. Page numbers should be numbered consecutively for all sheets thereafter. The number of total sheets should be shown on each page. See example cover sheet.
    2.  
    3. Original Plan Title Sheet: This is the original plan title sheet that was included as part of the project plans. Any changes in the original equalities or project lengths should be shown in their appropriate locations.
    4.  
    5. Typical Sections: All typical sections that were used in the construction of the project should be included.
    6.  
    7. Summary Sheets: The List of Pipe, Endwalls, Etc. summary sheet should be included in the As-Constructed Plans, but the quantities should not be revised and it is not necessary to line through the quantities. However, a note should be prominently placed stating “For as-constructed lengths, see plan sheets”.
    8.  
    9. Plan and Profile Sheets: The plan and profile sheet should show the following information:
    10.  
      1. Location of all right-of-way markers.
      2.  
      3. The final location of all control of access lines, if applicable, should be shown. These may or may not coincide with the right-of-way lines.
      4.  
      5. The location of all pipe lines and drainage structures with pipe lengths and types identified.
      6.  
      7. The location of all subdrain and shoulder drain lines and associated outlet pads.
      8.  
      9. Any changes in the right of way limits.
      10.  
      11. If a revised standard is used for any item during construction, this revised standard should be indicated on the plan sheet in the As-Constructed Plans.
      12.  
      13. The location of all fencing that has been placed.
      14.  
      15. All channel changes. 
    11. As-Constructed Plan Sheets for Structures: These plans should be revised in so far as dimensions and elevations are concerned. Where corrections are made, strike through - but leave legible - the original elevations and dimensions, and insert the corrected information over or beside the original information.
    12.  
      1. Piles should be numbered and lengths shown for each component of the structure. 
    13. Signing plans should be included in the As-Constructed plans. 
    The following certification shall appear on the cover sheet and shall be signed by the Design-Build Quality Manager: “I HEREBY CERTIFY THAT THIS PROJECT WAS CONSTRUCTED ACCORDING TO THE PLANS EXCEPT NOTED HEREIN.” Likewise, the following certification shall appear on the cover sheet and shall be signed by the Design-Build Quality Manager: “FINAL RIGHT-OF-WAY HAS BEEN CHECKED.” Signature lines shall be provided for the Resident Engineer and Division Right-of-Way Agent for the construction certification and Right-of-Way certification respectively.

  •     
    Materials Certification is the process by which the NCDOT certifies that all materials and workmanship on all projects are in compliance with the specifications. The Quality Systems Section within the Materials and Tests Unit (M & T) is responsible for conducting the Material Certification Review to ensure that accurate and sufficient documentation is available to verify the acceptable testing and inspection of critical materials and products used to build the project. The Materials Certification Review will begin within ten days after the “Acceptance Date Approval Alert” has been received by M & T, through the HiCAMS. The following is a limited list of items that will be reviewed:
     
    • Sampling and Testing in accordance with the Minimum Sampling Guide (MSG).
    • Independent Assurance.
    • QC/QA Programs.
    • Certified Laboratories and Sampling and Testing Technicians.
    • Pay Reductions.
    • Conversion Factors.
    • Alternate ID’s.
    • Material Receipts.
    • “Buy America” Letter.
    • Contract Bill of Materials (CBOM.)
    • Inspection Reports. 
    If the evaluation determines that there are shortages of acceptable test reports or unresolved discrepancies, the Resident Engineer will be asked to address these issues. See Project Certification Process Flow chart.
     
    The Materials Certification Review may be performed after acceptance of the project, but the process begins the first day of the project. The people who are vital in the project certification process are the project personnel (Resident Engineer, project inspectors) and M & T personnel. The responsibilities of each are listed below.
     
    • Project Personnel
    • Inspectors 
    • Sampling and inspection of project produced material in accordance with the MSG.
    • Verifying that pre-certified/ pretested material have the proper documentation and approval (stamp or Alternate ID.)
    • Material Receipts entered in HiCAMS in a timely manner.
    • Obtaining the correct certifications for materials.
    • Resident Engineers
    • Ensuring test results are entered in HiCAMS.
    • Addressing test shortages and discrepancies.
    • Materials and Tests Unit
    • Pretested material (precast and pre-stress.)
    • Independent Assurance.
    • Area Materials personnel (Section Materials Specialist and Area Materials Engineers) auditing/reviewing project specific materials to insure compliance with MSG and Specifications. 
    The Quality Systems Section will complete the Materials Certification Review and prepare a Non-Participation Letter for the State Materials Engineer. If all discrepancies were not resolved the letter will be sent to the Division Engineer. If the Division Engineer receives a Non-Participation letter then one or more of the following discrepancies have occurred.
     
    • The required number of samples was not obtained for a specific material.
    • The required documentation (certification type) was not obtained for a specific material.
    • The material was not approved or supplied from an “Approved Source.”
    • No Material Received Report (MRR).
    • No/incorrect alternate ID.
    • Materials were not removed from the CBOM.
    • Temporary Items.
    • M & T did not receive the Asphalt Roadway Inspection Reports (Form 605).
    • No/insufficient embankment and/or subgrade density tests.
    • ABC issues.
    • Conversion factors. 
    If the Division Engineer receives a Non-Participation Letter, the Resident Engineer should check HiCAMS for notes and emails in the “Materials Pre-Certification” module, review the discrepancies, and collect the needed documentation. The Resident Engineer may contact the following M & T personnel, should there be any questions regarding the Non-Participation letter.
     
    • Materials Operations Engineer (919) 329-4220
    • Quality Systems Engineer (919) 329-8495 

  •  
     

    GENERAL
     
    Documentation for the preparation of the final estimate assembly should begin when the construction of a project begins. A set of plans should be designated for recording construction changes and completion of items of work. Plan changes should be kept up to date so the information can be quickly transferred to the prints included in the final estimate assembly. Ticket and pay record quantities should be computed and recorded in HiCAMS when partial payments are made. As soon as practical, the ticket and pay records should be checked and verified in HiCAMS. No further action is required for such records prior to submission of the final estimate unless changes are made in the records. The final estimate should be prepared in accordance with the “Preparation and Checking” procedure below.
     
    The Division Engineer should perform a quality assurance check of the pay quantities and As-constructed Plans. After the quality assurance check by the Division Engineer, he shall notify the Contractor in writing of the final quantities and apparent liquidated damages. The quality assurance check should be performed as specified in “Preparation and Checking by the Division Engineer” procedure below.
     
    For the purpose of establishing the schedule for preparation and submission of the final estimate assembly, contracts are be broken into two classes as follows:
     
    1. Major contracts: major grading; grading and structure; paving, widening, and rehabilitation; and turnkey projects. These contracts typically have a total cost of more than $10 million.
       
    2. Minor contracts: all other contracts
    SCHEDULE FOR FINAL ESTIMATES.png 

    PREPARATION AND CHECKING
     
    BY THE RESIDENT ENGINEER
     
    The Resident Engineer should prioritize preparation of the various portions of the final estimate, beginning with those portions that will require the most time to complete. For example, preparation of As-Constructed Plans and calculation of excavation quantities (including submission of data to the Photogrammetry Unit) frequently require considerable time to complete. These items should be a high priority and performed as soon as practical. The Resident Engineer should record and compute pay quantities in accordance with the procedures contained in the “Records and Reports” section of the Construction Manual. The Resident Engineer should also make a 100% check of every calculation of quantities for which payment is included on the final estimate. Each calculation check should be made as soon as practical and by someone other than the person making the original calculation. After the calculations have been checked, the quantity should be verified in HiCAMS. Detailed instructions on checking individual Line Items are included in the “Final Estimate Checking Procedures”.
     
    After the final inspection has been made and the project accepted, the Acceptance Date should be entered on the Completion Tab of the Review Contract Details window of HiCAMS. This action is the trigger which causes the project to be removed from the online “Construction Progress Report”. Then, the Resident Engineer should prepare the final estimate assembly.
     
    After the Final Quantities have been updated in HiCAMS, the following areas should be reviewed and completed.
     
    1. Verify the Final Quantities: This can be done throughout the life of the project after the source document has been checked, but must be complete before submission of the Final Estimate.
       
    2. Material Prepayment Balances: All Material Prepayment balances on the Prepayments Tab of Review Estimates should be zero. If balances remain, enter the Previous Quantity amount in the Actual Reduction field. You do not need to generate the estimate for these reductions to take effect.
       
    3. Price Adjustment Recommendations: All PARs must be closed prior to forwarding the estimate. Go to the Review Pay Adjustment Recommendations window and check the Status column. Any PAR whose Status is not Closed, needs to be closed now. If a QA-2B Density PAR is not closed, contact the Construction Unit for assistance.
       
    4. Failing Samples: Review the View Pending Contract Samples listing for any Project Acceptance Samples which have a Sample Status of Does Not Meet Specs. These samples require a disposition quantity and a Sample Disposition Comment. Penalties can also be applied by clicking the PAR button on the Sample.
       
    5. Field Inspection Reports: Field Inspection reports for Concrete Pavement, Corrugated Metal Pipe, and Guardrail which have failing Materials and no Disposition Comment must have a comment entered.
       
    6. Failing Densities: All Failing Asphalt Densities should have a Pay Adjustment Recommendation and Pay Factor associated with them. Failing Densities are identified on the Standard Report called Density Asphalt QC Lots.
    When the calculation of all quantities has been checked and verified in HiCAMS, the estimate should be reviewed to determine the current amount of the estimate. A special estimate should be processed when there is a significant current amount, whether an increase or a decrease. The Resident Engineer should use his judgment in determining when another partial estimate should be processed. A partial estimate should normally be processed when the current amount of the final estimate is more than $5,000, a change is warranted in the amount of liquidated damages withheld, or processing of the final estimate may be delayed. To process another partial estimate, change the estimate type in HiCAMS to partial and generate the estimate. When another partial estimate is processed, the Resident Engineer must generate the final estimate after the partial estimate is paid. The Final Estimate Assembly should be prepared according to the procedure below. The final estimate in HiCAMS and the Final Estimate Assembly should be forwarded to the Division Engineer.
     
    The Resident Engineer is also responsible for completing the DBE/MB/WB Subcontract Commitment Payment Summary for each contract that has DBE/MB/WB goals. This is used to summarize the actual use of DBE/MB/WB participation as compared to the commitments stated in the contract by the prime contractor. The form is accessible on the Construction Unit website under Construction Resources, Construction Forms. Additional information regarding the DBE/MB/WB Subcontract Summary is included in this manual later in the Final Estimate section.

    BY THE DIVISION ENGINEER
     
    The Division Engineer should review the final estimate assembly for completeness and procedural compliance. He should also perform a quality assurance check of the pay quantities and As-constructed Plans. This check may be made by another Resident Engineer or at the Division office and should have all check marks identified by blue pencil or blue ink. The initials of the individual making the check marks should be placed on the title sheet and on the personnel page of Pay Record Book Number 1. The quality assurance check should consist of not less than 25% of the entire estimate. When the quality assurance check demonstrates that the final estimate assembly is incomplete, was not prepared in accordance with procedures, or the frequency of errors is unacceptable; the estimate should be returned to the Resident Engineer for correction or a 100% check made of the final estimate assembly.
     
    After the quality assurance check by the Division Engineer, he shall send the Contractor the Notification of Final Quantities letter; which includes the final quantities and apparent liquidated damages as specified in Article 109-9 of the Specifications. The letter shall also request that the Contractor submit the documents required by Article 109-10 for payment of the final estimate to the State Construction Engineer. Note: Form FHWA-47 is no longer required on any project. The Contractor should be informed that the final estimate would be held in the Division office for review until a specified date. The period allowed for review should be approximately two weeks for minor contracts and three weeks for major contracts after the date of the letter.
     
    The Contractor should be requested to advise in writing as to whether or not he desires to review the estimate. The final estimate assembly should be submitted to the Construction Unit immediately after the Contractor advises he does not desire to review the final estimate or immediately after the specified date unless the Contractor requests in writing that the final estimate be held beyond the specified date for his review. The Division Engineer should limit the time the final estimate is retained for the Contractor’s review to no more than 30 days unless a meeting has been scheduled with the Contractor to review the final quantities.
     
    A Project Closeout Conference may be held in accordance with the procedures below after the quality assurance check is complete and the Contractor has had sufficient time to review the final quantities and identify the claim issues.
     
    Following the closeout conference or review of the final quantities by the Contractor, necessary corrections should be made to the final estimate assembly and updated in HiCAMS. The Division Engineer should sign the necessary documents, and the final estimate assembly should be transmitted to the office of the State Construction Engineer immediately after the QA check is complete and after:
     
    1. The contractor advises he does not desire to review the final estimate
       
      OR 
       
    2. The date specified for the Contractor to review the final estimate has passed without reply from the Contractor
       
      OR 
       
    3. The Contractor reviews the final estimate or a closeout conference is held.
    The estimate should be forwarded to the Construction Unit in HiCAMS.

    BY THE CONSTRUCTION UNIT
     
    The Construction Unit will perform a procedural audit of the final estimate submitted by the Division Engineer. The Final Estimate quantities will not change if errors are found during the audit, but the Division Engineer will be notified in writing of the errors. The Construction Unit will also review the As-Constructed Plans and perform an audit of DBE/MB/WB payment reporting and utilization.

    THE FINAL ESTIMATE ASSEMBLY
     
    The Final Estimate Assembly consists of the following items:
     
    Transmittal Letter
    Contract Time Extension Report
    Liquidated Damages Report
    Contractual Overrun Calculations Sheets
    As Constructed Plans and Cross-Sections (if applicable)
    Supporting Documents
    DBE/MB/WB Subcontract Commitment Summary

    TRANSMITTAL LETTER
     
    A Transmittal Letter should be submitted for all final estimate assemblies and should be distributed as follows:
     
    Original - State Construction Engineer
    File Copy - Retained by Division Engineer
    Copy - Resident Engineer
     
    The completion date shown in the letter must agree with the completion date shown on all correspondence and that shown in the Project Diary.
     
    The portion of the letter that pertains to an overrun in the contract time must be in detail including intermediate completion dates. If the project was not completed on or before the original or revised completion date, the percent of contractual overrun/underrun must be calculated. The percent overrun/underrun is computed in accordance with Subarticle 108-10(B)1 of the Specifications, excluding Supplemental Agreements that extend the contract time and other items listed therein. (See details of calculating the contractual overrun below.)
     
    For Ticket Books, abbreviation of names is acceptable and contract line item numbers should be used rather that line item descriptions.

    CONTRACT TIME EXTENSION REPORT
     
    The Contract Time Extension Report is printed from Standard Reports in HiCAMS.

    LIQUIDATED DAMAGES REPORT
     
    The Liquidated Damages report is printed from the HiCAMS Review Estimates window. Change the Estimate Report Type to “Estimate Report for Contractors” and print the page entitled “Assessment of Liquidated Damages”.

    CONTRACTUAL OVERRUN CALCULATION SHEETS
     
    Copies of any correspondence or other documentation granting time are to be attached to the Final Estimate Transmittal Letter, and the time extensions entered in HiCAMS. Although not an extension of contract time, also attach copies of the documentation for any waiver of liquidated damages due to seasonal limitations.
     
    If the project was not completed on or before the original or revised completion date, the percent of contractual overrun/underrun and any pro-rata time extension must be calculated. The percent overrun/underrun is calculated in accordance with Subarticle 108-10(B)1 of the Specifications, excluding Supplemental Agreements that extend the contract time and other items listed therein. Calculations for the percent contractual overrun/underrun and pro-rata time should be attached to the Final Estimate Transmittal Letter. The Contractual Overrun figure calculated should be entered in HiCAMS on the Review Estimates Window Completion Tab in the field labeled Adjusted Overrun/Underrun Amount. It may or may not agree with the HiCAMS Contractual Overrun/Underrun Amount. If a pro-rata time extension is allowed, it should be entered in HiCAMS on the Review Estimates Window Damages Tab for the appropriate Contract Time.
     
    If a Supplemental Agreement that extends the contract time overruns in time, it is treated as a separate contract. The dollar amount of overrun applicable to the Supplemental Agreement is applied to the original estimated amount of the Supplemental Agreement and additional time is allowed in accordance with Article 108-10(B)2 of the Specifications. A breakdown of the original and final quantities involved in the work should be prepared for each Supplemental Agreement that grants time. It must show the monetary value for the affected pay items. These breakdowns and the calculations for the percent contractual overrun/underrun and any pro-rata time should be attached to the Final Estimate Transmittal Letter. The pro rata time extensions for the Supplemental Agreements should be aggregated with any other pro rata for that Contract Time and entered in the pro rata field on the Damages Tab in the Review Estimates window. In the event that the Supplemental Agreement was intended to grant time to more than one Contract Time and that time extension was omitted, a Department Initiated Claim should be entered extending the remaining Contract Time(s).
     
    Should a project have one or more intermediate contract times, each is to be treated on the same basis as contract time when calculating pro rata time extensions, as indicated in Article 108-10(A) of the Specifications. All intermediate contract times should be reviewed and the Work Completion Dates or times entered in HiCAMS on the Dates and Damages tab of the Contract Times window. If the intermediate contract time overruns in time, the percent of contractual overrun/underrun and any pro-rata time extension must be calculated. A breakdown of the original and final quantities involved in the work should be prepared for each intermediate contract time that overruns in time. It must show the monetary value for the affected pay items. These breakdowns and the calculations for the percent contractual overrun/underrun and any pro-rata time should be attached to the Final Estimate Transmittal Letter. Any time extension should be entered in HiCAMS on the Damages Tab of the Review Estimates window.
     
    After all authorized time extensions have been entered in HiCAMS, a copy of the Contract Time Extension Report should be printed out and attached to the Final Estimate Transmittal Form.

    AS-CONSTRUCTED PLANS AND CROSS-SECTIONS
     
    As construction of the project nears completion, the Resident Engineer should request full size plans for the production of the As-Constructed Plans. The request (email is acceptable) should be to the Contract Standards and Development Unit, Records and Documentation Management Officer, and should specify which print sets are needed, such as roadway, structure, utilities, etc. The As-Constructed Plans will be scanned and stored electronically so it is essential that all entries are neat and legible.
     
    NOTE: As-Constructed Plans are not required for projects such as resurfacing and demolition.
     
    On the right side of the cover sheet, the Division Right-of-Way Agent should sign the following certification: “Final right-of-way has been checked.”
     
    The following are requirements for various sheets of the As-Constructed Plans. The sheets are listed in the order they should appear in the As-Constructed Plans:
     
    1. Cover Sheet: This should be Sheet Number 1 of this portion of the assembly. Page numbers should be shown in the upper right hand corner. Page numbers should be numbered consecutively for all sheets thereafter. The number of total sheets should be shown on each page.
    2.  
    3. Original Plan Title Sheet: This is the original plan title sheet that was included as part of the project plans. Any changes in the original equalities or project lengths should be shown in their appropriate locations.
    4.  
    5. Typical Sections: All typical sections that were used in the construction of the project should be included.
    6.  
    7. General Note Sheet: If a revised standard is used in the construction of any item, this revision should be indicated on this sheet.
    8.  
    9. Summary Sheets: The List of Pipe, Endwalls, Etc. summary sheet should be included in the As-Constructed Plans, but the quantities should not be revised and it is not necessary to line through the quantities. However, a note should be prominently placed stating “For as-constructed lengths, see plan sheets”. Other summary sheets, such as guardrail, earthwork, etc., should not be included in the As-Constructed Plans.
    10.  
    11. Plan and Profile Sheets: The plan and profile sheet should show the following information:
       
      1. Location of all right-of-way markers. These markers should be consecutively numbered starting at the beginning of the project. These same numbers should be recorded in the pay record book. 
         
      2. The final location of all control of access lines, if applicable, should be shown. These may or may not coincide with the right-of-way lines.
         
      3. The location of all pipe lines. The length laid for all pipe lines except subdrain and shoulder drain should be shown on the plan sheets.
         
      4. The location of all subdrain and shoulder drain lines should be shown. Information should include station, line, and left, or right. This information can be drawn on each roadway plan sheet, drawn on a supplemental plan sheet and placed immediately after the roadway plan sheet, or summarized in a tabular format on each roadway plan sheet. 
         
      5. Any changes in the right-of-way limits. 
         
      6. If a revised standard is used for any item during construction, this revised standard should be indicated on the plan sheet in the As-Constructed Plans. This should be accomplished by neatly lining through with one inked line the standard indicated on the original plans and placing the corrected information above or beside the original information.  
         
      7. The location of all fencing that has been placed. 
         
      8. Where possible, show sketches of all borrow and waste pits. 
         
      9. Where applicable, note those existing roads that are to be abandoned, obliterated, or left in place and retained on the State Roads System. 
         
      10. All channel changes.
         
      11. All changes in the horizontal or vertical alignment. These changes should be shown in black ink. If the revision is such that it cannot be shown on the existing plan sheet, then a new plan sheet should be drawn. This sheet should show all appropriate topography, such as driveways, sidewalks, etc., right-of-way and property lines, curve data, and bearings. 
    12. Cross-Section Sheets: Original roadway plan cross-sections should not be included in the As-Constructed Plans. Cross-sections utilized for computation of quantities should be prepared as follows:
       
      1. A black pencil should be used to denote the original ground and a red pencil to denote final subgrade and side slopes on all cross-sections.
      2.  
      3. The names of the individuals who computed and checked the cross-sections should be shown in the lower right hand corner of the last sheet of cross-sections. If several different people did this work, each should identify his own work.
      4.  
      5. Cross-sections should normally be plotted to a minimum scale of one-inch equals five feet horizontal and vertical. However, if necessary, the scale may be adjusted.
      6.  
      7. Original and final cross-sections of fill areas are to be shown and computed only when there is waste to be deducted.
      8.  
      9. All cross-sections should be plotted with the stations running up the sheet.
      10.  
      11. Any material removed below subgrade should be clearly identified on the cross-sections in blue pencil or blue ink.
      12.  
      13. The pay record book(s) in which the cross-sections were recorded along with the page numbers where the information can be found should be shown on the first cross-section sheet. 
    13.  

    14. As-Constructed Plan Sheets for Structures: These plans should be revised in so far as dimensions and elevations are concerned. Where corrections are made, strike through - but leave legible - the original elevations and dimensions, and insert the corrected information over or beside the original information.
       
      1. All necessary sketches and computations to document the final quantities should be shown in the pay record book except the actual plotting of rod readings and the area computations of the cross-sections. If used, this information is to be shown on supplementary sheets in the As-Constructed Plans. The initials of the individuals plotting and checking the cross-sections and computing the areas as well as the date that the work was done should be shown.
      2.  
      3. Where extra depth concrete is involved with excavation cross-sections, they should be handled in the same manner. See Specific Instructions Pertaining to All Entries Made in Pay Record Books and Estimate Work Books - Structure Items: Excavation and Class A Concrete in this section of the Manual.
      4.  
      5. Piles should be numbered and pay lengths shown for each component of the structure.
      6.  
      7. All corrections made on the As-Constructed Plans should be made with black ink.
      8.  
      9. If the structure is located at a FEMA regulated crossing (Green Sheet Project Commitment and Title Block for As-Built Plans Certification), follow the guidance provided in the FEMA CERTIFICATION section of the Construction Manual.
      10.  
      11. Complete Biological Survey for Northern Long-Eared Bats. Follow guidance provided in the NLEB section of the Construction Manual.  
    15. Computation Sheets for Items not Computed in Pay Record Books: It is the intent of the procedures established by this section of the Manual that all computations concerning pay items should be made in the pay record book in which the measurements were recorded. It is recognized that there will be instances where this is not possible. In these instances the following procedures should be used:
       
      1. Sheets should be included in this portion of the assembly that contain the necessary sketches and computations.
      2.  
      3. The computations should be clearly labeled and the pay record book number(s) and page number(s) where the original measurements were recorded should be shown. The initials of the individual who made the computations and the individual who checked them should be shown on the computation sheets. 
    16. Signing plans should be included in the As-Constructed plans.

    SUPPORTING DOCUMENTS
     
    PAY RECORD BOOKS
     
    All pay record books should be submitted as part of the final estimate assembly. The contract number should be shown on the cover of each book. The total number of pay record books should be shown on the cover of each book, such as Number 1 of 12 , Number 2 of 12, etc. There should be only one series of book numbers for a given contract. Do not create a separate series for structures. Do not summarize pay record books, but do total each page.

    TICKET BOOKS
     
    Tickets issued for payment by weight in accordance with the Construction Manual should be securely bound prior to transmission of the assembly. There should be one numerical sequence of ticket book numbers for each line item.

    COMPUTER EARTHWORK COMPUTATION SHEETS
     
    When the quantity of an item is determined by the use of the Photogrammetry Unit, the original printed sheets that are transmitted to the Resident Engineer should be checked by the Resident Engineer and included as a part of the assembly.
     
    The visual display of earthwork computations furnished from the Photogrammetry Unit can be discarded at the discretion of the Resident Engineer.

    EARTHWORK COMPUTATION SHEETS
     
    If any quantities are manually calculated, Earthwork Computation Sheets (Form 220) should be used for the computation of unclassified excavation. Earthwork Computation Sheets (Form 230) should be used for the computation of borrow excavation. The first sheet of the computation sheets should be a summary of sources of borrow or unclassified excavation and their individual totals as well as the grand total for the item for individual lines, such as L, L-1, Y-1, etc. The sheets in which the computations for the individual line or source totals should be shown.

    COMPUTING IRREGULAR SURFACES
     
    The Roadway Design Manual prepared by the Roadway Design Unit contains tables that can be used for computing the area of irregular surfaces.

    SUPPLEMENTAL AGREEMENTS, COMPLETION DATE EXTENSIONS, AND RELEASE OF CLAIM
     
    A copy of correspondence authorizing an extension of the completion date(s), executed Releases of Claim, all active claim resolutions, and all signed, original Supplemental Agreements not previously submitted to the Central Construction Unit should be submitted with the final estimate assembly. Supplemental Agreements which grant time require special treatment. This topic is addressed further in the section “Contractual Overrun Calculation Sheets”.

    PROJECT DIARIES
     
    Any important dates or entries should be shown in an index on the inside cover of the project diary. These dates and notes would refer to entries in the project diary that would aid in the review of the project concerning liquidated damages, adjustments in compensation, or aid in the checking of the final estimate. All project diary books should be numbered consecutively in chronological order. The total number of project diary books should be shown on the cover of each book, such as Number 1 of 7 , Number 2 of 7 , etc.

    DBE/MB/WB SUBCONTRACT COMMITMENT SUMMARY
     
    The information pertinent for this summary is subcontractor payments, and replacements of any committed DBE/MB/WB subcontractor. The DBE/MB/WB Subcontract Commitment Summary form should only be completed for subcontractors who were submitted as committed DBE/MB/WB subcontractors to fulfill the goals in the contract. When completing this form, it is suggested that the Resident Engineer use the following items as deemed appropriate.
     
    1. Contract (Project Special Provisions).
       
    2. DBE/ MB/WB Replacement documentation.
       
    3. NCDOT DBE Payment Tracking System located on NCDOT webpage.
       
    4. DBE Payment Report in HiCAMS under Standard Reports.
    The form is accessible on the Construction Unit website under Construction Resources, Construction Forms.

    STATUS OF FINAL ESTIMATE
     
    The Status of Final Estimate Report is a quarterly report compiled by the Construction Unit and distributed to the Division Engineers, with copies to the Chief Engineer-Operations, Director of Field Support, Division Construction Engineers and the Roadway/Bridge Construction Engineers. This report lists all the contracts whose final estimate submission to the Construction Unit is overdue in accordance with the schedule for final estimates located in the Final Estimates Assembly Preparation Procedures section above. The report also denotes contracts that have appeared on the list more than one time, with an asterisk (*). If a contract appears on the Status of Final Estimates report more than once, the Division Engineer is required to submit a letter to the Chief Engineer detailing his plan to complete the final estimate.
  •  
     

     
    The Permit Bond is required in Article 105-15 of the Specifications. When the Department has placed or places load restrictions on potential haul roads adjacent to projects, the Contractor may exceed those load restrictions if he provides a Permit Bond and is issued a Special ‘Light Traffic Roads’ Permit from the Department, which are agreements that provide the following:
     
    1. Maintenance of the road by the Contractor to the satisfaction of the Engineer during the haul period.
       
    2. Repair by the Contractor of all damages to the road after the haul period is complete. This includes damages by all parties, not only the Contractor.
       
    3. Furnishing of a bond by the Contractor in an appropriate amount determined by the Engineer.
       
    4. Assumption of all costs for strengthening any bridges which may be necessary to carry weights up to the legal load limits.
       
    5. Indemnification of the Department form all claims from third parties due to hauling, maintenance, lack of maintenance, repair, or lack of repair, etc.
    The following is a sample copy of a Permit Bond and a Special ‘Light Traffic Roads’ Permit. Refer also to Article 105-15 of the Specifications and Section 1 of this Manual.

  •  
     

     
    The following are samples of a Bill of Sale and Consent of Surety that are to be used as a reference for formatting such documents. These documents may vary in their format depending upon individual circumstances, and companies, or individuals involved.
     
    The Bill of Sale and Consent of Surety are required in Article 109-5 of the Specifications prior to payment to the Contractor for materials delivered on the project.

  •  
     

     
    In order to comply with NCDOT’s Memorandum of Agreement with the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA), the Department must provide certification that projects with structures crossing FEMA streams have been completed in accordance with the agreed project commitments. The Hydraulics Unit is responsible for insuring that the Department meets FEMA compliance. In order to assist the Hydraulics Unit in this task, the person administering the project must provide a certification that the project has been constructed in accordance with the approved plans. Any alignment or grade deviation from the original plans that could affect hydraulic conveyance must be approved by the Hydraulic engineer prior to construction. An approved deviation should be marked on the appropriate plan sheet prior to certification.
     
    Projects which require certification will be identified in three ways. Examples of the three identifications are included at the end of this section.
     
    1. There will be Hydraulics project commitment and a Division commitment in the green sheets of the contract.
       
    2. A letter will be sent from the Hydraulics Unit to the project administrator at the beginning of the project outlining the requirements.  
       
    3. The appropriate sheets of the plans requiring certification will have a title block for the certification as follows.
    1. For bridges, the general layout sheet will contain the title block.
       
    2. For culverts, the following plan sheets will contain the title block.
    • The sheet showing the location sketch and profile along centerline of the culvert;
    • The sheet showing the culvert section normal to the roadway and end elevation.       
    The certification consists of a Professional Engineer’s seal and the following note placed above the area:
     
    I hereby certify these plans are the as-constructed plans.
     
    The certification should be made upon completion of the work in the floodplain. All approach fills, unclassified structure excavation, bents, and superstructure members should be complete prior to making the certification. The certification should be made on half-sized plan sheets and sent to the State Hydraulics Engineer. It is preferred that the certification be transmitted electronically (PDF) to the following email address:  NCDOT_Hydraulics_As-Built_Plans@ncdot.gov; however, a hard-copy through the courier service is also acceptable.

    GREEN-SHEETS FEMA CERTIFICATION COMMITMENT
     
    HYDRAULICS PROJECT COMMITMENT REGARDING FEMA COORDINATION: 
     
    The Hydraulics Unit will coordinate with the NC Floodplain Mapping Program (FMP), to determine status of project with regard to applicability of NCDOT’S Memorandum of Agreement, or approval of a Conditional Letter of Map Revision (CLOMR) and subsequent final Letter of Map Revision (LOMR).
     
    DIVISION COMMITMENT:  
     
    This project involves construction activities on or adjacent to FEMA-regulated stream(s). Therefore, the Division shall submit sealed as–constructed constructions plans to the Hydraulics Unit upon completion of project construction, certifying that the drainage structure(s) and roadway embankment that are located within the 100-year floodplain were built as shown in the construction plans, both horizontally and vertically. 

    AS-CONSTRUCTED CERTIFICATION CHECKLIST FOR FEMA-REGULATED STREAM CROSSINGS
     
    BRIDGES:
     
    • Verify rail type and rail height (nominal). Examples: 32” Alaska Rail; 42” Oregon Rail; 42” Standard Bridge Rail;
    • Note Begin/End Bridge centerline road grade point elevations
    • Note low chord elevations at all four corners of bridge. If interior bent caps are on a crest vertical curve, provide low chord elevations of at all interior bents.
    • Verify final “grade-to” excavation elevations associated with the proposed bridge opening. Only note if a “grade-to” excavation elevation differs from what was specified in the bridge plans.
    • Verify pier type and dimension.
    • Verify total bridge width and length.
    CULVERTS:
     
    • Verify culvert location sketch
       
    • Verify culvert length, size (opening), and number of barrels.
       
    • Verify sill dimensions if applicable.
       
    • Note inlet and outlet invert elevations (top of bottom slab)
       
    • Verify roadway profile grade(s) agrees with plans. Provide roadway profile sheet and note any grade changes if applicable. 
    Reference the following sample plan sheets for clarification:
     
  •  
     

    GENERAL
     
    Reference is made to Article 440-10 of the Specifications and Section 4 of this Manual which limits partial payments for structural steel to 95 percent of the pro rated bid price for the steel involved when no field painting has been performed and there is no separate bid item for painting structural steel.
     
    Currently, the majority of all bridges with steel beams or plate girders are being designed with Paint System 4 or unpainted steel. Field painting under Paint System 4 is limited to touch-up and an appearance coat on the outside of exterior beams.
     
    After complete erection of structural steel for any structural unit, the following payment will be allowed on the monthly estimate:
     
    1. Paint System 4 - 99.5 percent of the bid price.
       
    2. Unpainted Steel - 100 percent of the bid price.
    Typically, unless all structural steel on the project is erected within one estimate period, the above percentages will apply to the appropriate pro rata portion of the lump sum bid price. After field painting is satisfactorily completed, the retained percentage for Paint System 4 should be included in the next partial pay estimate.
     
    All allowed percentages will be subject to retainage in accordance with the Specifications.

    MATERIAL PAYMENTS FOR UNFABRICATED STRUCTURAL STEEL
     
    Material payments for unfabricated structural steel will be allowed in accordance with Article 109-5 of the Specifications. Payment can be made in an amount that is up to 95 percent of the invoice price from the supplier including shipping, handling, and other cost directly attributable to the delivery of the unfabricated steel material. This payment will be allowed under the following conditions:
     
    1. The Resident Engineer verifies that 95 percent of the invoice price, which represents that particular materials payment, is equal to or greater than $10,000 and the listed material on the invoice is identifiable to a specific structure. Invoices for material from more than one structure should be separated and assigned to each structure accordingly. Payment may include the cost of preparing shop drawings after the drawings have been approved.
       
    2. The Resident Engineer should request the Materials & Tests Unit to inspect the material and verify the location and acceptability of the material. The material should be in a separate location from other material and should be positively identifiable to the respective project.
       
    3. As a part of each request for an unfabricated materials payment, a distribution of material and the related costs identified to specific spans on each structure should be included. Receipt of this distribution should be required to allow compensation for fabricating cost on a per span basis. 
    This procedure as outlined above should be followed in order to convey a consistent and uniform method for making material payments for unfabricated structural steel.
     
    When a previous unfabricated material payment exists on a specific structure, requests for fabricating cost will be allowed on a per span basis. Invoice costs for fabricated structural steel shall include and list previous payments for unfabricated material and associated costs; therefore, these previous unfabricated material costs will be deducted from the invoice cost of the fabricated structural steel prior to making the materials payment. In no case shall the total material payment for the unfabricated and the fabricated costs exceed 95 percent of the total invoice cost of the fabricated structural steel.

  • RECORDS AND REPORTS

 ‭(Hidden)‬ Materials

 ‭(Hidden)‬ Measurement and Payment

Was this page helpful?